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While the museum is closed, we are getting creative with ways to bring the museum to you! Visit the Fralin from Home tab and check back often for new activity booklets, drawing videos, and more!

In the News

An online course speedily organized for more than 300 medical school students who were abruptly sent home from the University of Virginia in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic is highlighting the often overlooked connections between medical training and the arts.

Medical school professors Marcia and James Childress put together “Confronting Epidemics: Perspectives from History, Ethics, and the Arts” in a matter of days after the school’s sudden closure in mid-March.

“To provide context, under normal circumstances, medical students start checking in on patients at 5:30 or 6 a.m., stay in the hospital until between 4 and 6 p.m., and spend the rest of the evening studying for examinations,” says Lydia Prokosch, a third-year medical student who took the course. “It was jarring to go from a strenuous yet critical part of our education to having little to no structure.”

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (CBS19 NEWS) -- Many facilities are offering online options due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

These include the National Park Service, local governments, and museums.

The art museums at the University of Virginia have also turned to online outlets.

“In times of crisis, we usually do everything we can to keep the museum open, because we know how important it is for people to have a space for those contemplative experiences, a space where they can feel connected to something larger than themselves,” said Matthew McLendon, the J. Sanford Miller Family Director of the Fralin Museum of Art. “This time, though, the best way we could serve our community was to close our doors, so we immediately turned our attention to new online offerings that could provide some of those connections.”

As it did for almost every student, faculty and staff member, the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic has rapidly changed the course of this semester for the University of Virginia art museums.

Instead of exhibition galleries filled with students and community members, live tours for classes and faculty and all sorts of workshops and events, staff at The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA and the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection were suddenly looking at museums full of amazing art, with no one to enjoy it.

And so they got busy, doing what artists and art lovers do best: getting creative.

“In times of crisis, we usually do everything we can to keep the museum open, because we know how important it is for people to have a space for those contemplative experiences, a space where they can feel connected to something larger than themselves,” said Matthew McLendon, J. Sanford Miller Family Director of The Fralin. “This time, though, the best way we could serve our community was to close our doors, so we immediately turned our attention to new online offerings that could provide some of those connections.”

American Alliance of Museums

Quantifying a Commitment to Representation

Mar 18, 2020

I realized last summer that after twenty years in the museum field, I felt deeply frustrated.

When I enrolled in my first museum studies classes in the late 1990s, there were audible and inspiring calls to increase diversity in museums. However, according to recent stories citing dismal statistics, little has concretely changed since then. The data from the largest museums shows that tackling homogeneity and promoting inclusivity has only made incremental progress in museum exhibitions, collections, programming, and staffing. There are many reasons for this but, in my view, a major obstacle is the absence of actionable goals against which museums and museum leadership judge ourselves.

As a relatively new museum director at a thought-leading university, with a truly remarkable group of colleagues to collaborate with, I felt the Fralin Museum of Art needed to enact meaningful change. That’s what led us to announce a new, specific commitment to enrich our exhibition landscape by presenting underrepresented artists.

For indigenous artists all over the world, the march toward representation in museums has been slow and not at all steady. It has come in fits and starts.

In North America, Canadian institutions have generally made more sustained efforts at devoting space and resources to indigenous art than those in the United States. But that has been changing of late.

A current show at the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville offers American viewers a chance to see works by indigenous artists from a remote part of Australia’s Northern Territory known as Arnhem Land.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art and the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection partnered to present The Inside World: Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Memorial Poles. 

The Inside World, on view at the Fralin Jan. 24-May 24, 2020, presents 112 memorial poles by 55 artists from remote Aboriginal communities in the tropical northern region of Australia known as Arnhem Land. With this collaboration, which illustrates the potential impact that partnership could have on serving students, faculty and visitors, the two museums are exploring the possibility of sharing a larger space on University Grounds in the future. 

“The Inside World is an exciting opportunity for the Fralin Museum of Art and Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection — the only museum dedicated to Aboriginal art outside of Australia — to serve students, faculty and visitors in a new way,” said Matthew McLendon, the J. Sanford Miller Family Director at the Fralin. “By coming together in one location, we are able to present visual and academic experiences that advance new ideas and new ways to view the world.” 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) - Rooms filled with priceless, delicate, one-of-a-kind pieces of work. It’s the perfect place for a group of rambunctious toddlers to explore their artistic talents, right? Absolutely.

It’s not exactly what you’d expect to find inside the Fralin Museum of Art. Fun for the Young, a chance for two to four-year-olds and their adult companions to find their inner creative souls.

“I wouldn’t really think ‘oh, I’m going to take my kids to a museum’,” Shannon Williamson, of Charlottesville, said. “It wouldn’t be the first thing on my list as a stay at home mom in Charlottesville.”

Of course, there’s a method to the madness. Read a couple of books, look at some art, and then enjoy an art-making experience all together while dad or grandma makes sure to get it all on camera.

What do Georgia O’Keeffe and the video game Minecraft have in common?

According to Frankie Mananzan, a third-year University of Virginia student, these are the kinds of questions she faces daily.

As chair of the Student Docents at The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA, Mananzan gives tours of the gallery spaces and engages with curious museum guests of all ages. Following The Fralin’s mission to embrace the validity of any visitor’s opinions on the art they encounter, some interesting comparisons arise.

The Minecraft comment came from a 10-year-old museum patron, and is a prime example of why Mananzan became a docent in the first place.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has received a gift of nearly $1.6 million from Dr. Carol R. Angle. In creating this endowment, the University of Virginia matched this gift by adding additional funds totaling nearly $800,000, through the University’s Bicentennial Professors Fund. The endowment supports and names the museum’s academic curator position, the Carol R. Angle Academic Curator. Since its inception in 2012 through funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, M. Jordan Love has held this position. 

This is the second endowment created by Angle for the Fralin. Now retired in Charlottesville, Angle has made it her mission to address many of the world’s greatest challenges. After spending 45 years at the University of Nebraska Medical Center as a pediatrician, nephrologist and toxicologist, Angle became known as one of the nation’s leading experts on lead poisoning. Today, the self-described “museum hound” and longtime patron of the Fralin has shifted her focus to the arts and education in her community and how it can address both health and community issues. In 2016, Angle also created the Angle Exhibition Fund at the Fralin, which was the first named endowment to support exhibitions at the museum. 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va (CBS19 NEWS) -- From now until May, artwork created by aboriginal artists from Australia will be on display on the second level of the Fralin Museum of Art.

Henry Skerritt, the curator at the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection says having these pieces of art on display is an incredible opportunity for people in and around Charlottesville to come see.

"This really is a spectacular exhibition, it's a world-class exhibition, and it's the kind of exhibition that we've only been able to bring here to Charlottesville, to central Virginia, because of the collaboration between Kluge-Ruhe and the Fralin Museum of Art, and it's really special for our two institutions to come together to showcase something that people in Charlottesville would never be able to see otherwise," said Skerritt.

The Fralin Museum of Art and the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection are partnering to present The Inside World: Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Memorial Poles.

The Inside World, on view at the Fralin Jan. 24-May 24, 2020, presents 112 memorial poles by 55 artists from remote Aboriginal communities in the tropical northern region of Australia known as Arnhem Land. With this collaboration, which illustrates the potential impact that partnership could have on serving students, faculty and visitors, the two museums are exploring the possibility of sharing a larger space on University Grounds in the future.

“The Inside World is an exciting opportunity for the Fralin Museum of Art and Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection — the only museum dedicated to Aboriginal art outside of Australia — to serve students, faculty and visitors in a new way,” said Matthew McLendon, the J. Sanford Miller Family Director at the Fralin. “By coming together in one location, we are able to present visual and academic experiences that advance new ideas and new ways to view the world.”

The homeland of about 12,000 aboriginal people in Australia is more than 10,000 miles from Virginia, but this week at five different locations in Charlottesville, more than 200 works by Australia’s top indigenous artists will be on display. 

The art of Australia’s native people is as old and mysterious to other cultures as its music, and both will be featured at 2 p.m. Saturday in UVA's Fralin Museum of Art.  That’s where 112 painted wooden poles now stand – some of them 14 feet tall, weighing more than 200 pounds.  

This week, something extraordinary will happen in Charlottesville: Four exhibitions of contemporary Aboriginal Australian art will open in four different venues across town, bringing the total number of such exhibitions currently on view to six. And a seventh will open in mid-February.

Having this many concurrent shows of contemporary Indigenous Australian art in one locale is an extremely rare occurrence outside of Australia, if it’s even happened at all, says Henry Skerritt, curator of the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA—the only museum outside of Australia dedicated to Indigenous Australian art.

And it’s some of “the best Australian contemporary art” at that, adds Skerritt. Many of these artists have won prestigious awards, and their work is collected by some of Australia’s major museums (as well as some international celebrities, like comedian Steve Martin). We’re talking “major, heavy-hitter artists,” says Skerritt.

While the field of art is often thought of as a progressive one, social critics — and artists themselves — have long complained of minority groups not being shown their due. A monolithic curation strategy is seen as out of touch and exclusive in a time where diversity is recognized as a strength. Museums and galleries are working to change this. At the University, the Fralin Museum of Art hopes to utilize its extensive historical collection and engage with diverse contemporary artists in order to present a broader range of art.

In September, the museum announced a commitment to have at least 50 percent of its collection come from artists belonging to underrepresented backgrounds. The effort represents a long term effort, and recent exhibitions like “Otherwise” — which showcased queer artists and art interpretations — are evidence of the Fralin living up to its commitment. The Fralin hopes to present diversity not only in race and gender, but also in terms of sexual orientation, geographical origins, socioeconomic status and indigenous perspectives.

In “Time to Get Ready: fotografía social,” a National Museum of Mexican Art exhibit on view at The Fralin Museum of Art, you will find all the classic elements one expects in a “good” photography show. Maria Varela’s photographs are compositionally sophisticated and emotionally intimate. They are candids, yet they look like movie stills. They look like they were taken by someone who is very serious about all the aesthetic choices that make up the art of photography.

But Varela is quick to note that she is not an artist, nor is she a journalist. One of the few Latinx activists involved in the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, Varela was an organizer who started taking photographs for the educationalmaterials she was producing for black workers in the South. Like Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. and other leaders in the movement, she was motivated by her religious beliefs to take an active role in dismantling white supremacy.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has named Laura Minton curator of exhibitions. Minton joins the Fralin from Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. A senior member of the curatorial team, Minton’s responsibilities at the Fralin include building a comprehensive national and international exhibitions schedule and curating rigorous scholarly projects that provide a foundation for transdisciplinary and socially engaged discourse. Minton, who reports directly to the museum’s J.Sanford Miller Family Director and chief curator, began at the Fralin on Oct. 21, 2019. Minton expands a curatorial department at the Fralin that includes Hannah Cattarin, who was also recently promoted to assistant curator. Cattarin served as curatorial assistant at the museum prior to her promotion. 

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia (UVA) in Charlottesville has named Laura Minton curator of exhibitions. Minton comes to the institution from the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, where she served as a curatorial assistant in the department of prints and drawings. As the newest senior member of the Fralin’s curatorial team, Minton will be responsible for organizing the museum’s exhibition program and scholarly projects.

The institution also promoted curatorial assistant Hannah Cattarin to assistant curator. During her tenure at the museum, Cattarin helped with a rehang of the entire collection to display more works by women artists. She also organized the exhibition “Otherwise,” which examines the influence LGBTQ culture has had on modern and contemporary art and is on view until January 5, 2020. Prior to joining the Fralin, she served as a curatorial assistant in the UB Art Galleries at the University of Buffalo.

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia helps thousands of visitors each year grow their appreciation for, and knowledge of, art.

It also helps UVA medical students improve their diagnostic abilities.

On Halloween, roughly 50 second-year medical students gathered in the museum’s tiled lobby for a two-hour “Clinician’s Eye” workshop, one of several offered over about two weeks. The program, now in its seventh year, is mandatory for all second-year medical students this year. It aims to hone students’ observation skills and encourages them to challenge their assumptions and gather clues to make decisions.

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has named Laura Minton as curator of exhibitions and Hannah Cattarin as assistant curator.

Minton joins the Fralin from the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and her responsibilities include building a comprehensive national and international exhibitions schedule and curating rigorous scholarly projects that provide a foundation for transdisciplinary and socially engaged discourse.

She reports directly to the museum’s J.Sanford Miller Family Director and chief curator. Minton is expanding the curatorial department at the Fralin that includes Cattarin, who was also recently promoted to assistant curator. Prior to this, she served as a curatorial assistant at the museum.

The Daily Progress

Art Notes for Nov. 7 through Nov. 13

Nov 06, 2019

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has named Laura Minton curator of exhibitions. Minton, who started her new duties Oct. 21, is responsible for creating a comprehensive schedule of national and international exhibitions and curating rigorous scholarly projects.

Hannah Cattarin recently was promoted to assistant curator at the Fralin. She previously served as curatorial assistant.

The Christian Science Monitor

Can art help unite a diverse society? Museums aim to find out.

Oct 10, 2019

When the Museum of Modern Art in New York reopens Oct. 21, its revamped and expanded gallery space will reflect something that’s trending in museums across the United States: a focus on those less heard from.

[...]

In Charlottesville, Virginia, where white supremacists staged a 2017 march that ended with the murder of a counterprotester, the University of Virginia’s Fralin Museum of Art has resolved to devote half of its exhibitions to underrepresented art. “It’s important to make a real, discernible commitment,” says museum director Matthew McLendon. “There are difficult conversations our society needs to have. Mediation through the work of art, being respectful of cultures and experiences other than our own, adds a different tenor and a return of civility to the conversation.”

With the Cville Pride Festival happening this past weekend, it’s important to take some time to reflect not only on the roots of LGBTQ activism but also its erasure from art history. This past June marked the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising. This movement, led by transgender women of color, was against discriminatory police raids on the Stonewall Inn and bar in New York City and was an important catalyst in the struggle for LGBTQ rights in the United States. “Otherwise,” a new exhibit at the Fralin Museum of Art, gives a perfect opportunity to think about where we have come from and where we might want to go. 

Assistant Curator Hannah Cattarin said the exhibit that she spent the last year researching and compiling is not necessarily about Stonewall as much as it is dedicated to it.

“There is no universal queer aesthetic,” Cattarin said as she guided our group of around 30 “partygoers” through the exhibit’s three sections — “Self,” “Subject” and “Style.” “There is something here for everyone to find themselves in.”

Broadway To Vegas

ART AND ABOUT

Sep 15, 2019

THE FRALIN MUSEUM OF ART at the University of Virginia has announced that historically underrepresented artists will be a focus in at least half of its exhibitions moving forward. This action is the result of recent data showing that the majority of artists featured in U.S. museum exhibitions continue to lack diversity well into the 21st century. The museum defines underrepresented artists as those with diverse racial, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, Indigenous, disability/ability, socioeconomic, geographic, religious and/or age identities.

On the Fralin's current exhibitions schedule are Otherwise, on view now through January 5, 2020, which explores the influence of LGBTQ+ culture on visual art on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, and  The Inside World: Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Memorial Poles, opening January 24, 2020, a partnership with the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection also at UVA. 

Recent projects have included an installation by contemporary artist Vanessa German, an examination of Georgia O’Keeffe’s watercolors produced during her time at the University of Virginia in the early 20th century, and an exhibition of work by contemporary Native American artists in which they reflected on historic Native art from the collection.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia announces that historically underrepresented artists will be a focus in at least half of its exhibitions moving forward. This action is the result of recent data showing that the majority of artists featured in U.S. museum exhibitions continue to lack diversity well into the 21st century. The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, an iconic and distinguished university that continues to confront the truth and impact of its complicated past on its community, is uniquely positioned to take a stand. The museum defines underrepresented artists as those with diverse racial, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, Indigenous, disability/ability, socioeconomic, geographic, religious and/or age identities. 

“I enrolled in my first museum studies class in 1999; unfortunately, the conversation about the lack of diversity in museums has remained much the same. As a director, I’m in a position now to do something about it,” said Matthew McLendon, J. Sanford Miller Family Director at the University of Virginia’s Fralin Museum of Art. 

In setting this goal, which is included in the museum’s 2020-25 strategic plan, the institution has the support of the University, its advisory council and its staff. 

From now on, the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will focus on underrepresented artists in at least half of its exhibitions.

The goal, included in the museum’s 2020-2025 strategic plan, will help counter a lack of diversity in museum settings that persists across the country.

The Fralin is defining underrepresented artists as those with diverse identities in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, disability and ability, socioeconomic, geography, religion, ethnicity and Indigenous status.

Its new goal already is reflected in new exhibitions on display at the Fralin and others on the schedule. “Otherwise,” an exploration of the influence of LGBTQ+ culture on visual art timed to recognize the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, can be seen through Jan. 5, 2020. Coming up is “The Inside World: Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Memorial Poles,” which will open Jan. 24 in partnership with Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at UVa.

Fralin Museum of Art Vows to Mount Exhibitions Spotlighting Underrepresented Artists
Inspired by recent data revealing a lack of diversity in museum programming across the United States, the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville will dedicate at least half of its future exhibitions to historically underrepresented artists. This goal is outlined in the institution’s 2020–2025 strategic plan. One of its upcoming exhibitions that is part of this initiative is “The Inside World: Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Memorial Poles,” which opens next January. The Fralin has also implemented this commitment to the work of diverse artists with its recent acquisitions, which include work by Zanele Muholi and Martine Gutierrez, among others. Matthew McLendon, the museum’s director, said in a statement, “If we truly believe that museums should be welcoming to all, then we must ensure that our art and artists reflect that.”

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia is drawing on its vast permanent collection and adding some works from private collections for its latest exhibitions.

“Asian Art from the Permanent and Select Private Collections,” curated by professors Dorothy Wong and Daniel Ehnbom, can be seen through Nov. 10. Look for paintings, drawings and other two-dimensional works from Japan, India and China from the 16th century to the 21st.

Wong said during Wednesday’s press preview that the gallery space chosen for the exhibition helped inspire the look of the exhibition.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will offer its own contribution to a nationwide exploration of LGBTQ+ history and culture with a new exhibition opening Aug. 9, 2019. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City, which became a rallying cry for gay rights activists.  

Otherwise, on view Aug. 8, 2019-Jan. 5, 2020, utilizes more than 40 modern and contemporary works from The Fralin’s permanent collection, along with two exciting new acquisitions, to examine the influence LGBTQ+ culture has had and continues to have on artistic production from the early 20th century to the present. It showcases works by artists who identify as LGBTQ+ as well as those who have dealt significantly with LGBTQ+ issues within their work.

The exhibition is curated by Hannah Cattarin, the Museum’s assistant curator. Cattarin, who has a master’s degree from the University of Essex, is part of the Fralin’s commitment to bring younger voices into the curatorial process. “Otherwise is a way to reexamine what we take for granted as ‘normal’ and reinvigorate our community’s relationship with the Museum’s collection,” she said.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will offer its own contribution to a nationwide exploration of LGBTQ+ history and culture with a new exhibition opening Aug. 8, 2019. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City, which became a rallying cry for gay rights activists.  

Otherwise, on view Aug. 8, 2019-Jan. 5, 2020, utilizes more than 40 modern and contemporary works from The Fralin’s permanent collection, along with two exciting new acquisitions, to examine the influence LGBTQ+ culture has had and continues to have on artistic production from the early 20th century to the present. It showcases works by artists who identify as LGBTQ+ as well as those who have dealt significantly with LGBTQ+ issues within their work. 

The exhibition is curated by Hannah Cattarin, the Museum’s curatorial assistant. Cattarin, who has a master’s degree from the University of Essex, is part of the Fralin’s commitment to bring younger voices into the curatorial process. “Otherwise is a way to reexamine what we take for granted as ‘normal’ and reinvigorate our community’s relationship with the Museum’s collection,” she said. 

Charlottesville, Virginia: the small town that’s home to more than 500 miles of Blue Ridge hiking trails, the NCAA championship-winning Virginia Cavaliers, and a restaurant-per-capita density that rivals major cities like New York City and San Francisco. In this college town, you’ll find students, tourists, and locals mingling at hidden-gem restaurants, or drinking pints of Bold Rock cider as they watch the sun set over the Blue Ridge Mountains. You’ll find Thomas Jefferson’s home at Monticello, and you’ll find his pride and joy– the University of Virginia. You’ll find wineries, breweries, and cideries, all complete with stunning views.

Charlottesville may boast myriad activities, destinations, and acclaimed restaurants, but even with its fast-paced growth, the city still maintains its small-town spirit. From hikes to wineries to possibly the world’s best bagels, this small town has something for everyone. Add Charlottesville to your list of this year’s destinations, and be sure to check out these spots along the way.

American Alliance of Museums

An After-School Program Gives Refugee Children a Creative Boost

Jul 01, 2019

One of the many things that make Charlottesville, Virginia special is that it serves as a destination city for the International Rescue Committee, which helps refugees settle into their new countries. Since 1998, more than three thousand refugees from countries on three different continents have relocated to Charlottesville. Many of them are families with young children, and with the parents working long hours to make a life in their new city, family time and enrichment activities are in short supply and often take a back seat to everyday needs.

At The Fralin Museum of Art, we had been seeking to meet this need in the community when I met Angela Corpuz, the art teacher at Greenbrier Elementary School. Greenbrier is the designated school for refugee children in Charlottesville, so Angela was a familiar and trusted presence in many refugee families’ lives and was well positioned to identify children with the most need for support. We also brought studio artist and recent UVA graduate Golara Haghtalab on board to co-lead the program. Golara emigrated from Iran in 2011 and she shared her experiences and contributed valuable insights during the development of the curriculum.

Together, we developed a school-museum partnership that offered an after-school art curriculum encouraging children to communicate about who they arethe experiences they’ve had, and what is important to them. We also wanted the program to foster the pride students have for their national identities.

Best Colleges

Best Colleges for LGBTQ Students

Jun 17, 2019

According to a study conducted by Campus Pride, about 23% of LGBTQ faculty members and students were significantly more likely to experience harassment than their heterosexual peers. In addition, LGBT students and faculty members were significantly less likely to feel very comfortable with their environment on-campus. These findings demonstrate the need for colleges to take an active stance against LGBTQ harassment and discrimination ― a stance that, in part, will make it so that LGBTQ students feel safe and welcome to attend.

This year we partnered with Campus Pride to bring you the top colleges in the country for LGBTQ students. The ranking below combines our Academic and Affordability Metrics along with the Campus Pride Index score, which is a comprehensive national rating system that measures LGBTQ-friendly campus life. Campus Pride takes an exhaustive and multifaceted approach, considering eight LGBTQ-inclusive factors to reach a measurement. The listing also includes descriptions of unique campus resources that provide support to students of various gender and sexual identities.

Marion Strobel Mitchell, a lyric poet and co-editor of Poetry magazine, was referred to as a “lady poet” by detractors who minimized a woman’s place in her discipline. That’s why her daughter, Joan Mitchell — an Abstract Expressionist painter who became a leading postwar American artist — jokingly referred to herself in kind as a “lady painter.”

“It was a little joke she had,” Kristen Chiacchia said. It was the origin of the title that author Patricia Albers chose for her 2011 biography of the respected America painter, and Chiacchia selected it for the new exhibition opening Friday at Second Street Gallery.

Visitors who attend “Lady Painters: Inspired by Joan Mitchell,” which opens with a reception in the contemporary art space from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Friday, will see the lasting impact of Mitchell’s assertive colors and abstract vision, and see how it inspired what Chiacchia calls “women just having fantastic careers.” What they won’t see are soft saturations of stereotypically ladylike pastels.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (CBS19 NEWS) -- A special exhibit will help mark the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York City this August.

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will be exploring the influence of LGBTQ+ culture on art with an exhibit that will open on Aug. 9.

The exhibit, called Otherwise, will include more than 40 modern and contemporary works from the museum's permanent collection and two new acquisitions to examine that influence from the early 20th century to present.

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will offer its own contribution to a nationwide exploration of LGBTQ+ history and culture with a new exhibition opening Aug. 8. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City, which became a rallying cry for gay rights activists.

Otherwise, on view Aug. 9, 2019-Jan. 5, 2020, utilizes more than 40 modern and contemporary works from The Fralin’s permanent collection, along with two exciting new acquisitions, to examine the influence LGBTQ+ culture has had and continues to have on artistic production from the early 20th century to the present. It showcases works by artists who identify as LGBTQ+ as well as those who have dealt significantly with LGBTQ+ issues within their work.

Who will be UVa’s next world-famous graduate?

Might someone from this weekend’s graduating class be among the stars of the future — in the arts, politics, science, business, technology, entertainment?

Each of us likely knows a handful of names of famous people who attended the University of Virginia. In its nearly 200 years of education, UVa has produced plenty of success stories; and the internet is full of lists of well-known Wahoos.

The New York Times

Mark These Dates: A Wave of Art Is Coming Your Way

Mar 12, 2019

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.

“Sometimes. We. Cannot. Be. With. Our. Bodies.”

Through July 7

Vanessa German, who makes her home and art in Pittsburgh now, says she created this immersive two-gallery sound, sculpture and text installation as a reaction to the deaths — and often unsolved murders — of African-American women and girls. Some figures in this work have no heads; some heads have no bodies; some hands are balled into fists; and found objects are everywhere. “I think of it,” she has said, “as an act of restorative justice.” Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, 155 Rugby Road, 434-924-3592, uvafralinartmuseum.virginia.edu/

Antiques and the Arts Weekly

Fralin Features Vanessa German's Multisensory Installation

Mar 08, 2019

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- A powerful multisensory installation of sculpture and sound by American contemporary artist, poet and activist Vanessa German is on view at the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia Feb. 22 through July 7, 2019. The major work, which combines figures without their heads, heads without their bodies, found objects and ephemera, grapples with some of the most profound challenges of contemporary life, including violence, loss and inequity, particularly in communities of color and for the LGBTQ community.  

Entitled sometimes. we. cannot. be. with. our. bodies., the installation was originally presented at the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 2017. It was organized for the Fralin by Matthew McLendon, the Museum’s J. Sanford Miller Family director. 

German has described the installation as “a dimensional living reckoning. the living reckoning is bold,erruptive,disruptive work against systems & pathologies that oppress & subvert overt & covert violence onto & into the lives & humanity of marginalized people on this land.”

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – A powerful multisensory installation of sculpture and sound by American contemporary artist, poet and activist Vanessa German will be on view at the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia Feb. 22 through July 7, 2019. The major work, which combines figures without their heads, heads without their bodies, found objects and ephemera, grapples with some of the most profound challenges of contemporary life, including violence, loss and inequity, particularly in communities of color and for the LGBTQ community.

Entitled sometimes. we. cannot. be. with. our. bodies., the installation was originally presented at the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 2017. It was organized for the Fralin by Matthew McLendon, the Museum’s J. Sanford Miller Family director.

German has described the installation as “a dimensional living reckoning. the living reckoning is bold,erruptive,disruptive work against systems & pathologies that oppress & subvert overt & covert violence onto & into the lives & humanity of marginalized people on this land.”

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