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The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia (UVA) in Charlottesville has named Laura Minton curator of exhibitions. Minton comes to the institution from the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, where she served as a curatorial assistant in the department of prints and drawings. As the newest senior member of the Fralin’s curatorial team, Minton will be responsible for organizing the museum’s exhibition program and scholarly projects.

The institution also promoted curatorial assistant Hannah Cattarin to assistant curator. During her tenure at the museum, Cattarin helped with a rehang of the entire collection to display more works by women artists. She also organized the exhibition “Otherwise,” which examines the influence LGBTQ culture has had on modern and contemporary art and is on view until January 5, 2020. Prior to joining the Fralin, she served as a curatorial assistant in the UB Art Galleries at the University of Buffalo.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has named Laura Minton curator of exhibitions. Minton joins the Fralin from Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. A senior member of the curatorial team, Minton’s responsibilities at the Fralin include building a comprehensive national and international exhibitions schedule and curating rigorous scholarly projects that provide a foundation for transdisciplinary and socially engaged discourse. Minton, who reports directly to the museum’s J.Sanford Miller Family Director and chief curator, began at the Fralin on Oct. 21, 2019. Minton expands a curatorial department at the Fralin that includes Hannah Cattarin, who was also recently promoted to assistant curator. Cattarin served as curatorial assistant at the museum prior to her promotion. 

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia helps thousands of visitors each year grow their appreciation for, and knowledge of, art.

It also helps UVA medical students improve their diagnostic abilities.

On Halloween, roughly 50 second-year medical students gathered in the museum’s tiled lobby for a two-hour “Clinician’s Eye” workshop, one of several offered over about two weeks. The program, now in its seventh year, is mandatory for all second-year medical students this year. It aims to hone students’ observation skills and encourages them to challenge their assumptions and gather clues to make decisions.

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has named Laura Minton as curator of exhibitions and Hannah Cattarin as assistant curator.

Minton joins the Fralin from the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and her responsibilities include building a comprehensive national and international exhibitions schedule and curating rigorous scholarly projects that provide a foundation for transdisciplinary and socially engaged discourse.

She reports directly to the museum’s J.Sanford Miller Family Director and chief curator. Minton is expanding the curatorial department at the Fralin that includes Cattarin, who was also recently promoted to assistant curator. Prior to this, she served as a curatorial assistant at the museum.

The Daily Progress

Art Notes for Nov. 7 through Nov. 13

Nov 06, 2019

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has named Laura Minton curator of exhibitions. Minton, who started her new duties Oct. 21, is responsible for creating a comprehensive schedule of national and international exhibitions and curating rigorous scholarly projects.

Hannah Cattarin recently was promoted to assistant curator at the Fralin. She previously served as curatorial assistant.

The Christian Science Monitor

Can art help unite a diverse society? Museums aim to find out.

Oct 10, 2019

When the Museum of Modern Art in New York reopens Oct. 21, its revamped and expanded gallery space will reflect something that’s trending in museums across the United States: a focus on those less heard from.

[...]

In Charlottesville, Virginia, where white supremacists staged a 2017 march that ended with the murder of a counterprotester, the University of Virginia’s Fralin Museum of Art has resolved to devote half of its exhibitions to underrepresented art. “It’s important to make a real, discernible commitment,” says museum director Matthew McLendon. “There are difficult conversations our society needs to have. Mediation through the work of art, being respectful of cultures and experiences other than our own, adds a different tenor and a return of civility to the conversation.”

With the Cville Pride Festival happening this past weekend, it’s important to take some time to reflect not only on the roots of LGBTQ activism but also its erasure from art history. This past June marked the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising. This movement, led by transgender women of color, was against discriminatory police raids on the Stonewall Inn and bar in New York City and was an important catalyst in the struggle for LGBTQ rights in the United States. “Otherwise,” a new exhibit at the Fralin Museum of Art, gives a perfect opportunity to think about where we have come from and where we might want to go. 

Assistant Curator Hannah Cattarin said the exhibit that she spent the last year researching and compiling is not necessarily about Stonewall as much as it is dedicated to it.

“There is no universal queer aesthetic,” Cattarin said as she guided our group of around 30 “partygoers” through the exhibit’s three sections — “Self,” “Subject” and “Style.” “There is something here for everyone to find themselves in.”

Broadway To Vegas

ART AND ABOUT

Sep 15, 2019

THE FRALIN MUSEUM OF ART at the University of Virginia has announced that historically underrepresented artists will be a focus in at least half of its exhibitions moving forward. This action is the result of recent data showing that the majority of artists featured in U.S. museum exhibitions continue to lack diversity well into the 21st century. The museum defines underrepresented artists as those with diverse racial, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, Indigenous, disability/ability, socioeconomic, geographic, religious and/or age identities.

On the Fralin's current exhibitions schedule are Otherwise, on view now through January 5, 2020, which explores the influence of LGBTQ+ culture on visual art on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, and  The Inside World: Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Memorial Poles, opening January 24, 2020, a partnership with the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection also at UVA. 

Recent projects have included an installation by contemporary artist Vanessa German, an examination of Georgia O’Keeffe’s watercolors produced during her time at the University of Virginia in the early 20th century, and an exhibition of work by contemporary Native American artists in which they reflected on historic Native art from the collection.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia announces that historically underrepresented artists will be a focus in at least half of its exhibitions moving forward. This action is the result of recent data showing that the majority of artists featured in U.S. museum exhibitions continue to lack diversity well into the 21st century. The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, an iconic and distinguished university that continues to confront the truth and impact of its complicated past on its community, is uniquely positioned to take a stand. The museum defines underrepresented artists as those with diverse racial, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, Indigenous, disability/ability, socioeconomic, geographic, religious and/or age identities. 

“I enrolled in my first museum studies class in 1999; unfortunately, the conversation about the lack of diversity in museums has remained much the same. As a director, I’m in a position now to do something about it,” said Matthew McLendon, J. Sanford Miller Family Director at the University of Virginia’s Fralin Museum of Art. 

In setting this goal, which is included in the museum’s 2020-25 strategic plan, the institution has the support of the University, its advisory council and its staff. 

From now on, the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will focus on underrepresented artists in at least half of its exhibitions.

The goal, included in the museum’s 2020-2025 strategic plan, will help counter a lack of diversity in museum settings that persists across the country.

The Fralin is defining underrepresented artists as those with diverse identities in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, disability and ability, socioeconomic, geography, religion, ethnicity and Indigenous status.

Its new goal already is reflected in new exhibitions on display at the Fralin and others on the schedule. “Otherwise,” an exploration of the influence of LGBTQ+ culture on visual art timed to recognize the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, can be seen through Jan. 5, 2020. Coming up is “The Inside World: Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Memorial Poles,” which will open Jan. 24 in partnership with Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at UVa.

Fralin Museum of Art Vows to Mount Exhibitions Spotlighting Underrepresented Artists
Inspired by recent data revealing a lack of diversity in museum programming across the United States, the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville will dedicate at least half of its future exhibitions to historically underrepresented artists. This goal is outlined in the institution’s 2020–2025 strategic plan. One of its upcoming exhibitions that is part of this initiative is “The Inside World: Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Memorial Poles,” which opens next January. The Fralin has also implemented this commitment to the work of diverse artists with its recent acquisitions, which include work by Zanele Muholi and Martine Gutierrez, among others. Matthew McLendon, the museum’s director, said in a statement, “If we truly believe that museums should be welcoming to all, then we must ensure that our art and artists reflect that.”

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia is drawing on its vast permanent collection and adding some works from private collections for its latest exhibitions.

“Asian Art from the Permanent and Select Private Collections,” curated by professors Dorothy Wong and Daniel Ehnbom, can be seen through Nov. 10. Look for paintings, drawings and other two-dimensional works from Japan, India and China from the 16th century to the 21st.

Wong said during Wednesday’s press preview that the gallery space chosen for the exhibition helped inspire the look of the exhibition.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will offer its own contribution to a nationwide exploration of LGBTQ+ history and culture with a new exhibition opening Aug. 9, 2019. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City, which became a rallying cry for gay rights activists.  

Otherwise, on view Aug. 8, 2019-Jan. 5, 2020, utilizes more than 40 modern and contemporary works from The Fralin’s permanent collection, along with two exciting new acquisitions, to examine the influence LGBTQ+ culture has had and continues to have on artistic production from the early 20th century to the present. It showcases works by artists who identify as LGBTQ+ as well as those who have dealt significantly with LGBTQ+ issues within their work.

The exhibition is curated by Hannah Cattarin, the Museum’s assistant curator. Cattarin, who has a master’s degree from the University of Essex, is part of the Fralin’s commitment to bring younger voices into the curatorial process. “Otherwise is a way to reexamine what we take for granted as ‘normal’ and reinvigorate our community’s relationship with the Museum’s collection,” she said.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will offer its own contribution to a nationwide exploration of LGBTQ+ history and culture with a new exhibition opening Aug. 8, 2019. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City, which became a rallying cry for gay rights activists.  

Otherwise, on view Aug. 8, 2019-Jan. 5, 2020, utilizes more than 40 modern and contemporary works from The Fralin’s permanent collection, along with two exciting new acquisitions, to examine the influence LGBTQ+ culture has had and continues to have on artistic production from the early 20th century to the present. It showcases works by artists who identify as LGBTQ+ as well as those who have dealt significantly with LGBTQ+ issues within their work. 

The exhibition is curated by Hannah Cattarin, the Museum’s curatorial assistant. Cattarin, who has a master’s degree from the University of Essex, is part of the Fralin’s commitment to bring younger voices into the curatorial process. “Otherwise is a way to reexamine what we take for granted as ‘normal’ and reinvigorate our community’s relationship with the Museum’s collection,” she said. 

Charlottesville, Virginia: the small town that’s home to more than 500 miles of Blue Ridge hiking trails, the NCAA championship-winning Virginia Cavaliers, and a restaurant-per-capita density that rivals major cities like New York City and San Francisco. In this college town, you’ll find students, tourists, and locals mingling at hidden-gem restaurants, or drinking pints of Bold Rock cider as they watch the sun set over the Blue Ridge Mountains. You’ll find Thomas Jefferson’s home at Monticello, and you’ll find his pride and joy– the University of Virginia. You’ll find wineries, breweries, and cideries, all complete with stunning views.

Charlottesville may boast myriad activities, destinations, and acclaimed restaurants, but even with its fast-paced growth, the city still maintains its small-town spirit. From hikes to wineries to possibly the world’s best bagels, this small town has something for everyone. Add Charlottesville to your list of this year’s destinations, and be sure to check out these spots along the way.

American Alliance of Museums

An After-School Program Gives Refugee Children a Creative Boost

Jul 01, 2019

One of the many things that make Charlottesville, Virginia special is that it serves as a destination city for the International Rescue Committee, which helps refugees settle into their new countries. Since 1998, more than three thousand refugees from countries on three different continents have relocated to Charlottesville. Many of them are families with young children, and with the parents working long hours to make a life in their new city, family time and enrichment activities are in short supply and often take a back seat to everyday needs.

At The Fralin Museum of Art, we had been seeking to meet this need in the community when I met Angela Corpuz, the art teacher at Greenbrier Elementary School. Greenbrier is the designated school for refugee children in Charlottesville, so Angela was a familiar and trusted presence in many refugee families’ lives and was well positioned to identify children with the most need for support. We also brought studio artist and recent UVA graduate Golara Haghtalab on board to co-lead the program. Golara emigrated from Iran in 2011 and she shared her experiences and contributed valuable insights during the development of the curriculum.

Together, we developed a school-museum partnership that offered an after-school art curriculum encouraging children to communicate about who they arethe experiences they’ve had, and what is important to them. We also wanted the program to foster the pride students have for their national identities.

Best Colleges

Best Colleges for LGBTQ Students

Jun 17, 2019

According to a study conducted by Campus Pride, about 23% of LGBTQ faculty members and students were significantly more likely to experience harassment than their heterosexual peers. In addition, LGBT students and faculty members were significantly less likely to feel very comfortable with their environment on-campus. These findings demonstrate the need for colleges to take an active stance against LGBTQ harassment and discrimination ― a stance that, in part, will make it so that LGBTQ students feel safe and welcome to attend.

This year we partnered with Campus Pride to bring you the top colleges in the country for LGBTQ students. The ranking below combines our Academic and Affordability Metrics along with the Campus Pride Index score, which is a comprehensive national rating system that measures LGBTQ-friendly campus life. Campus Pride takes an exhaustive and multifaceted approach, considering eight LGBTQ-inclusive factors to reach a measurement. The listing also includes descriptions of unique campus resources that provide support to students of various gender and sexual identities.

Marion Strobel Mitchell, a lyric poet and co-editor of Poetry magazine, was referred to as a “lady poet” by detractors who minimized a woman’s place in her discipline. That’s why her daughter, Joan Mitchell — an Abstract Expressionist painter who became a leading postwar American artist — jokingly referred to herself in kind as a “lady painter.”

“It was a little joke she had,” Kristen Chiacchia said. It was the origin of the title that author Patricia Albers chose for her 2011 biography of the respected America painter, and Chiacchia selected it for the new exhibition opening Friday at Second Street Gallery.

Visitors who attend “Lady Painters: Inspired by Joan Mitchell,” which opens with a reception in the contemporary art space from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Friday, will see the lasting impact of Mitchell’s assertive colors and abstract vision, and see how it inspired what Chiacchia calls “women just having fantastic careers.” What they won’t see are soft saturations of stereotypically ladylike pastels.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (CBS19 NEWS) -- A special exhibit will help mark the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York City this August.

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will be exploring the influence of LGBTQ+ culture on art with an exhibit that will open on Aug. 9.

The exhibit, called Otherwise, will include more than 40 modern and contemporary works from the museum's permanent collection and two new acquisitions to examine that influence from the early 20th century to present.

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will offer its own contribution to a nationwide exploration of LGBTQ+ history and culture with a new exhibition opening Aug. 8. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City, which became a rallying cry for gay rights activists.

Otherwise, on view Aug. 9, 2019-Jan. 5, 2020, utilizes more than 40 modern and contemporary works from The Fralin’s permanent collection, along with two exciting new acquisitions, to examine the influence LGBTQ+ culture has had and continues to have on artistic production from the early 20th century to the present. It showcases works by artists who identify as LGBTQ+ as well as those who have dealt significantly with LGBTQ+ issues within their work.

Who will be UVa’s next world-famous graduate?

Might someone from this weekend’s graduating class be among the stars of the future — in the arts, politics, science, business, technology, entertainment?

Each of us likely knows a handful of names of famous people who attended the University of Virginia. In its nearly 200 years of education, UVa has produced plenty of success stories; and the internet is full of lists of well-known Wahoos.

The New York Times

Mark These Dates: A Wave of Art Is Coming Your Way

Mar 12, 2019

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.

“Sometimes. We. Cannot. Be. With. Our. Bodies.”

Through July 7

Vanessa German, who makes her home and art in Pittsburgh now, says she created this immersive two-gallery sound, sculpture and text installation as a reaction to the deaths — and often unsolved murders — of African-American women and girls. Some figures in this work have no heads; some heads have no bodies; some hands are balled into fists; and found objects are everywhere. “I think of it,” she has said, “as an act of restorative justice.” Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, 155 Rugby Road, 434-924-3592, uvafralinartmuseum.virginia.edu/

Antiques and the Arts Weekly

Fralin Features Vanessa German's Multisensory Installation

Mar 08, 2019

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- A powerful multisensory installation of sculpture and sound by American contemporary artist, poet and activist Vanessa German is on view at the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia Feb. 22 through July 7, 2019. The major work, which combines figures without their heads, heads without their bodies, found objects and ephemera, grapples with some of the most profound challenges of contemporary life, including violence, loss and inequity, particularly in communities of color and for the LGBTQ community.  

Entitled sometimes. we. cannot. be. with. our. bodies., the installation was originally presented at the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 2017. It was organized for the Fralin by Matthew McLendon, the Museum’s J. Sanford Miller Family director. 

German has described the installation as “a dimensional living reckoning. the living reckoning is bold,erruptive,disruptive work against systems & pathologies that oppress & subvert overt & covert violence onto & into the lives & humanity of marginalized people on this land.”

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – A powerful multisensory installation of sculpture and sound by American contemporary artist, poet and activist Vanessa German will be on view at the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia Feb. 22 through July 7, 2019. The major work, which combines figures without their heads, heads without their bodies, found objects and ephemera, grapples with some of the most profound challenges of contemporary life, including violence, loss and inequity, particularly in communities of color and for the LGBTQ community.

Entitled sometimes. we. cannot. be. with. our. bodies., the installation was originally presented at the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 2017. It was organized for the Fralin by Matthew McLendon, the Museum’s J. Sanford Miller Family director.

German has described the installation as “a dimensional living reckoning. the living reckoning is bold,erruptive,disruptive work against systems & pathologies that oppress & subvert overt & covert violence onto & into the lives & humanity of marginalized people on this land.”

Vanessa German grew up in Los Angeles in a creative household, wearing clothes her artist mother made, writing stories, and crafting creations from the scrap materials her mom laid out on the dining room table for her and her siblings.

“We were makers as a way of life,” says German, the 2018 recipient of the $200,000 Don Tyson Prize, which recognizes “significant achievements in the field of American art.” 

“My earliest memories of joy and knowing and understanding a sense of euphoria in being alive was through making things—the joy of gluing lace to cardboard and realizing I could make a separate reality in a story different than what existed in living reality. That is the way we came to know ourselves.”

Vanessa German, Site-Specific Installation 
Feb. 22 through July 7, 2019

A powerful multisensory installation of sculpture and sound by American contemporary artist, poet and activist Vanessa German will be on view at the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia Feb. 22 through July 7, 2019. The major work, which combines figures without their heads, heads without their bodies, found objects and ephemera, grapples with some of the most profound challenges of contemporary life, including violence, loss and inequity, particularly in communities of color and for the LGBTQ community.

A powerful multisensory installation of sculpture and sound by American contemporary artist, poet and activist Vanessa German will be on view at the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia Feb. 22 through July 7, 2019. The major work, which combines figures without their heads, heads without their bodies, found objects and ephemera, grapples with some of the most profound challenges of contemporary life, including violence, loss and inequity, particularly in communities of color and for the LGBTQ community.

Entitled sometimes. we. cannot. be. with. our. bodies., the installation was originally presented at the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 2017. It was organized for the Fralin by Matthew McLendon, the Museum’s J. Sanford Miller Family director.

German has described the installation as “a dimensional living reckoning. the living reckoning is bold,erruptive,disruptive work against systems & pathologies that oppress & subvert overt & covert violence onto & into the lives & humanity of marginalized people on this land.”

In 2018, artists and curators across the United States have been crafting brilliant exhibitions across the US, exploring themes of identity and community in innovative ways. Ebony G. Patterson made a maximalist tribute to victims of violence in her home country of Jamaica, while Joel Otterson crafted work recalling his parents’ professions as a seamstress and plumber. Indigenous artists took the stage at the Anchorage Museum’s Unsettled and Jeffrey Gibson’s This is the Day at the Wellin Museum. The enthralling official Obama portraits, painted by Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, were revealed at the National Gallery in DC, putting Black fine artists into the national consciousness. This list is an insight into the tastes of our US writers and the shows that moved them.

[...]

8. Unexpected O’Keeffe: The Virginia Watercolors and Later Paintings at the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia

The New Criterion

This year in museums

Dec 18, 2018

It is not news that the United States—and, perhaps, much of the rest of the world—has become an angrier place, filled with protests and expressions of contempt. So it probably does not come as a surprise that museums around the country and elsewhere have been the site of exhibitions, lectures, and impromptu demonstrations against the very institutions that reveal the level of current and overall discontent.

[...]

Museums have sought to get ahead of this discontent by staging exhibitions and talks that look at visual manifestations of protest. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston offered a month-long series of talks this fall about propaganda. The High Museum of Art in Atlanta displayed sculptural installations and screened a documentary about Tommie Smith’s raised-fist gesture during the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City. And the University of Virginia’s Fralin Museum of Art offered a visual guide to twentieth-century protests by artists.

On 12 August of this year, my town of Charlottesville, Virginia, reluctantly commemorated the first anniversary of a deadly “Unite the Right” rally. We woke recalling last summer, when throngs of white nationalists raged here, spilling from Court Square past places where we had eaten birthday dinners or lay in yogic shavasana. For this dark observance, the new governor sent 1,000 riot police to blockade downtown like an apartheid of grief. We passed police checkpoints to file on to Fourth Street, to scrawl chalk hymns on the pavement near the place where Heather Heyer was killed and 19 others were battered. All year long, at home, at work, some of us have struggled to reconcile that racist display with what we find lovely about our town.

Two days after that painful anniversary, I attended a public event called Signs of Change, the first in a series that aims to educate participants about our town’s bleak racial history and encourage reflection through artmaking. Part of a national initiative called For Freedom: 50 States, Charlottesville’s Signs was largely designed by the Fralin, a museum which sits on the University of Virginia’s immaculate grounds. Museum educators such as Lisa Jevack chose to focus on seminal events that contorted Charlottesville’s African American communities, including the demolition of Vinegar Hill. “We hoped participants would come away shocked, with their eyes opened,” Jevack said.

Art & Object

A New Origin Story for Georgia O’Keeffe

Dec 05, 2018

Before her big break in New York, Georgia O'Keeffe was getting invaluable lessons and inspiration at the University of Virginia.

The scripted origin story of American modernist Georgia O’Keeffe usually goes something like this: photographer and modern art gallerist Alfred Stieglitz saw her abstract charcoal drawings on New Year’s Eve of 1915 and immediately admired their radical quality. “Finally, a woman on paper!” he famously exclaimed. “They’re the purest, finest, sincerest things that have entered [my gallery] in a long while.” A few months later he exhibited ten of the drawings at 291, his avant-garde midtown Manhattan gallery, in a debut that was a surefire path to art world stardom.

That chain of events surely happened, but pinpointing O’Keeffe’s genesis at that particular moment ignores her arduous journey learning to translate the real-life objects she observed into a sensuously abstract language of shapes and forms. “There’s nothing less real than realism,” O’Keeffe is often quoted as saying, but how she got there is a skipped-over part of her story. That chapter began far removed from New York and Stieglitz (her future husband), in the historic and mountainous surroundings of Charlottesville, Virginia.

WHY GO: First and foremost, Charlottesville VA is a college town: home to the Thomas Jefferson designed University of Virginia. But it’s also part of a region rich in the arts, spirit making, and full of creative entrepreneurs and chefs with diverse backgrounds. 

I discovered that residents of Charlottesville want you to come and see what they are really like, and enjoy some incredible sights, food, and drink while doing so. Discover Georgia O’Keeffe’s artistic origins, the only Australian Aboriginal Art Museum in the United States, a top art gallery tucked miles away on hilly farmland, a cattle ranch distillery with some of the best bourbon and burgers (made from mash-fed cows) you’ll ever scarf down, the only Sake Brewery in Virginia, a thinking (wo)man’s Wine Shop, great shopping, fantastic restaurants, and so much more. 

On “The Brady Bunch,” it was “Marcia, Marcia, Marcia.” This month in the art world, it’s “Georgia Georgia, Georgia.” Georgia O’keeffe can be found around every corner from exhibits across the country to auctions.

While attention to O’Keeffe has been given for going on 100 years, surprises are still being discovered, including a mostly unknown sibling possessing major talent of her own.

With an open palm, Teri Greeves gestures to a handful of small, intricately beaded Kiowa Indian cradleboards lined up inside a glass display case.

Kiowa Indians are known for their abstract beadwork motifs, she tells the small crowd that’s gathered to hear her speak at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia. And while these cradleboards were made in the 19th century, likely for dolls, they’re not unlike the one that swaddled Greeves, a member of the Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma, when she was a newborn on Wyoming’s Wind River Indian Reservation in the 1970s. 

“I came home in a fully beaded cradleboard. From the moment I was born, I was encased in glass beads,” she says. Her Italian father made the wooden spines to anchor and support the swaddling sack, and he, together with Greeves’ Kiowa and Comanche mother, designed the beadwork. A Shoshone Indian woman, a mother figure to Greeves’ mother, beaded the design to the sack. It likely required hundreds of hours of work, says Greeves, and it makes her feel extraordinarily loved.

Near the end of his preseason press conference at John Paul Jones Arena last week, University of Virginia men’s basketball coach Tony Bennett went out of his way to laud former players Malcolm Brogdon, Joe Harris and Justin Anderson, who announced a few days earlier that they are collaborating with former UVA football star Chris Long to bring clean water to Africa.

“That warmed my heart more than almost anything – [their] thinking of others,” Bennett said.

At the root of their philanthropy is a shared experience at UVA, where being a student is about so much more than any one thing that you happen to do while you’re on Grounds – even more than, say, beating Duke.

[...]

Q. Other than John Paul Jones Arena, what’s your favorite place on Grounds?

Braxton Key: “I like going by [the Fralin Museum of Art]. I have a class over there – Greek art history. It’s just something different, a way to get your mind away from basketball. I always walk around the building just to see different pieces of art.”

 

The New York Times

Back to School With a Side of Art

Oct 25, 2018

Modest little college museums? Maybe they exist somewhere, on quiet campuses across the nation, but there are also magnificent university-affiliated institutions like these. And in terms of this season’s wide-ranging exhibitions, none seem limited by geography. Georgia O’Keeffe, queen of the Southwest, is in the Jeffersonian South; Andy Warhol, king of New York night life, is hanging in Silicon Valley; and lots of ancient Middle Eastern objects have settled in Philadelphia.

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA
(CHARLOTTESVILLE)

“Unexpected O’Keeffe: The Virginia Watercolors and Later Paintings,” Fralin Museum of Art

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia presents Unexpected O'Keeffe: The Virginia Watercolors and Later Paintings, on view Oct. 19, 2018-Jan. 27, 2019. This rare exhibition explores Georgia O’Keeffe’s watercolor studies produced during her time at the University of Virginia (UVA) in the summers from 1912 to 1916, and will include several key sketches and paintings as well as other works demonstrating her developing style. This is the first time the watercolors have been on view outside the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 

“It is an honor and a thrill to bring Georgia O’Keeffe’s works created in and around the University of Virginia back to UVA for the first time since they were produced,” said Matthew McLendon, J. Sanford Miller Family director at The Fralin. “Visitors will be able to walk out of the gallery and find the same points-of-view O’Keeffe used; they can experience the same qualities of light.”

Ask people to describe a Georgia O’Keeffe painting, and most will mention prominent flowers, striking colors, New Mexico landscapes and cows’ skulls. But before she made a name for herself on a national and international scale, a young O’Keeffe was filling a notebook with watercolor depictions of the Rotunda, Minor Hall, gardens and other features of the University of Virginia.

“Unexpected O’Keeffe: The Virginia Watercolors and Later Paintings,” which opens Friday at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, gives visitors an unprecedented glimpse of paintings she made during her time studying and teaching art in Charlottesville about a century ago. Among its treasures are watercolor studies of what were then new features on the UVa Grounds, such as the new Law Building, known these days as Minor Hall.

Between 1912 and 1916, O’Keeffe, who’d already been working as a commercial artist, spent her summers in Charlottesville with her mother, who ran a boarding house that still serves as student housing; these days, it’s for members of UVa’s rugby team. Although UVa did not admit women at the time, women were permitted to take selected summer term classes, and O’Keeffe studied art with Alon Bement and later served as his teaching assistant.

radioIQ | wvtf

The Unexpected Georgia O'Keeffe

Oct 16, 2018

The artist Georgia O’Keeffe is remembered as a painter of Southwestern landscapes and flowers, but it turns out her early works were done at the University of Virginia where she studied and taught.  Now, UVA plans to show those as part of an exhibit called Unexpected O’Keeffe. 

As a young artist, Georgia O’Keeffe got off to a promising start in New York, but when her family fell on hard times she decided to abandon her career as an artist and return to her parents’ home in Charlottesville. Professor Elizabeth Turner says women were admitted to summer courses at UVA, and Georgia’s sisters were learning about an exciting new way to paint.

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