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Sep 18, 2019

200 W Main St, Charlottesville, VA 22902
7:00 pm @ Violet Crown

We are pleased to present The Fralin Downtown, a new film series on the Arts, screened at The Violet Crown and funded by an Arts Enhancement grant from the Office of the Provost and the Vice Provost for the Arts. 

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Paris Is Burning

Directed by Jennie Livingston

Starring Brooke Xtravaganza, André Christian

Where does voguing come from, and what, exactly, is throwing shade? This landmark documentary provides a vibrant snapshot of the 1980s through the eyes of New York City’s African American and Latinx Harlem drag ball scene. Made over seven years, Paris Is Burning offers an intimate portrait of rival fashion “houses,” from fierce contests for trophies, to house mothers offering sustenance in a world rampant with homophobia and transphobia, racism, AIDS, and poverty. Featuring legendary voguers, drag queens, and trans women—including Willi Ninja, Pepper LaBeija, Dorian Corey, and Venus Xtravaganza—Paris Is Burning brings it, celebrating the joy of movement, the force of eloquence, and the draw of community.

Presented in partnership with The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.

https://charlottesville.violetcrown.com/movie/HO00002048/2019-09-18

Sep 20, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
6:00 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Introducing FRALIN AFTER FIVE!

Our late nights have moved from Thursday to Friday. The museum will remain open until 8 pm.

On September 20, Fralin docent Suzanne Tanner offers sketching in the gallery. www.suzannetannertanner.com

Drawing materials provided, however you may bring your own (pencils only, please!).

Space is limited. Please RSVP to laj2m@virginia.edu

Stay tuned for more details about future Friday programs.

Sep 27, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
5:30 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Join us for the Museum’s most popular, recurring social event: Final Fridays! Enjoy lively conversation with friends, connect with art, listen to music, and snack on tasty food and beverages. Want a quick introduction to one of our exhibitions? Final Fridays feature Spotlight Talks by our student docents at 6:15 and 6:45 pm.

Final Fridays are held on the last Fridays of August, September, October, January, February, March, and April, and are free for museum members. Student membership is free with a UVA email address through the support of Arts$ program and non-member guests may attend for a fee of $3.

Sep 28, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
10:00 am @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

These popular programs combine age-appropriate tours with hands-on art activities that make the Museum's exhibitions accessible to children. 

New session! 10 am - 12 pm

1–3 pm: 5–7 year olds and their grownups 

3–5 pm: 8–12 year olds and their grownups 

Registration is required. Please email museumoutreach@virginia.edu or call 434.243.2050.

Sep 28, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
2:00 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Time to Get Ready: fotografía social

Organized by the National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago, IL

Maria Varela first engaged in social justice activism by joining the Young Christian Students (YCS) at her south-side Chicago High School. YCS was an international organization inspired by liberation theology to transform oppressive conditions in workplaces, schools and communities. After graduating from college in 1961, Varela worked for two years as a campus organizer for the National Staff of YCS. In 1963, she accepted an invitation to join the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), a civil rights organization operating in the U.S. South.

In 1968 the experienced civil rights activist accepted an invitation from Reies López Tijerina (1926-2015) to join the Land Grant Movement in New Mexico: a movement to restore ancestral lands taken by the U.S. Government and/or stolen by land speculators. Tijerina and other Latino leaders were invited to participate in the Poor Peoples Campaign in Washington DC in June of 1968. Maria Varela was the only photographer embedded with the Chicano delegation for the duration of the campaign.

“The images in this exhibition reflect the evolution of resistance movements over nearly three decades, from demonstrations to political organizing to establishing alternative institutions, which would model what we would do ‘if we were in charge’.”

– Maria Varela

El primer compromiso de Maria Varela con el activismo por la justicia social fue cuando se unió a los Jóvenes Estudiantes Cristianos (YCS) en la escuela preparatoria del lado sur de Chicago. La YCS era una organización internacional inspirada por la teología de la liberación que establecía transformar las condiciones opresivas en los lugares de trabajo, las escuelas y las comunidades. Después de graduarse de la universidad (1961), Varela trabajó dos años como organizadora del campus para el Personal Nacional del YCS. En 1963, aceptó la invitación a unirse al Comité Coordinador Estudiantil No Violento (SNCC), una organización de derechos civiles que funciona en el sur de los Estados Unidos.

En 1968 la experimentada activista de los derechos civiles aceptó una invitación de Reies López Tijerina (1926-2015) a unirse al movimiento chicano Land Grant Movement en Nuevo México: un movimiento para restaurar tierras ancestrales tomadas por el gobierno de los EE.UU. y/o robadas por los especuladores de la tierra. Tijerina y otros líderes latinos fueron invitados en junio de 1968 a Washington DC a participar en la Campaña de los Pueblos Pobres. Maria Varela fue la única fotógrafa incluida en la delegación chicana durante el transcurso de la campaña.

“Las imágenes de esta exhibición reflejan la evolución de los movimientos de resistencia durante casi tres décadas, desde las demostraciones hasta la organización política para establecer instituciones alternativas que pudieran generar modelos de lo que haríamos ‘si estuviéramos a cargo’.”

– Maria Varela

Exhibition organized by the National Museum of Mexican Art, Chicago. Sponsors: Chicago Park District, Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, Illinois Arts Council Agency and Southwest Airlines.

This exhibition is made possible for The Fralin Museum of Art through generous support from the Office for Equal Opportunity and Civil Rights at the University of Virginia and The Fralin Museum of Art Volunteer Board.

The Fralin Museum of Art’s programming is made possible through generous support of The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation. We also wish to thank our in-kind donors: WTJU 91.1 FM and Ivy Publications LLC’s Charlottesville Welcome Book.

Oct 08, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
12:00 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Inspired by the fiftieth anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising, Otherwise seeks to visualize LGBTQ+ themes and histories as a way of valuing them. Art historian David Getsy defines the ‘otherwise’ as the “endless positions of apartness from which queer stances are posited.” The exhibition brings together work by over twenty-five modern and contemporary artists from The Fralin’s permanent collection to examine the influence LGBTQ+ culture has had and continues to have on artistic production from the early twentieth century to the present. The exhibition presents works by artists who identify as LGBTQ+, as well as artists who have explored queer themes throughout their work.

Otherwise examines queer histories past and present through three themes: Self, Subject, and Style. Self examines visualizations of personal identity, Subject looks at representations of queer culture from both within the LGBTQ+ community and beyond, and Style addresses the problematic impulse to rely on a distinctive categorization of the work of queer artists while exploring the ways in which stigma has and continues to influence the visibility of LGBTQ+ artists. The exhibition includes work by Berenice Abbott, Rosa Bonheur, Paul Cadmus, Nan Goldin, Robert Indiana, Ray Johnson, Ellsworth Kelly, Howard William Kottler, Marie Laurencin, George Platt Lynes, Marisol, Duane Michals, Yasumasa Morimura, Louise Nevelson, René Peña, Bernard Perlin, Adrian Piper, Robert Rauschenberg, Kiki Smith, Paul Thek, Mark Tobey, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, and Fred Wilson, with two recently-acquired works by Martine Gutierrez, and Zanele Muholi.

Oct 10, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
6:00 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

RSVP to museumoutreach@virginia.edu

Dr. Irène P. Mathieu is a pediatrician and writer at the University of Virginia. She is the author of Grand Marronage (Switchback Books, 2019), which was selected as Editor’s Choice for the Gatewood Prize and runner-up for the Cave Canem/Northwestern book prize; orogeny (Trembling Pillow Press, 2017), which won the Bob Kaufman Book Prize; and the galaxy of origins (dancing girl press, 2014). Her poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Narrative, Boston Review, Southern Humanities Review, Callaloo, TriQuarterly, and elsewhere. Irène is on the editorial boards of Muzzle Magazine and the Journal of General Internal Medicine's humanities section. A member of the Jack Jones Literary Arts speakers’ bureau, she has received fellowships from Fulbright, Callaloo, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts.

 

Lauren K. Alleyne is the author of two collections of poetry, Difficult Fruit (Peepal Tree Press 2014), and Honeyfish (New Issues & Peepal Tree, 2019). Her work has appeared in numerous publications including The Atlantic, Ms. Muse, Women’s Studies Quarterly, Interviewing the Caribbean, The Crab Orchard Review, among many others. Recent honors for her work include a 2017 Phillip Freund Alumni Prize for Excellence in Publishing (Cornell University), the 2016 Split This Rock Poetry Prize, and a Picador Guest Professorship in Literature (University of Leipzig, Germany, 2015). She is currently Assistant Director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center and an Associate Professor of English at James Madison University. Find out more about her at www.laurenkalleyne.com.

 

Valencia Robin is a poet and painter. Her first collection of poems, Ridiculous Light, won Persea Books’ 2018 Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize. A Cave Canem Fellow and a cofounder of GalleryDAAS at the University of Michigan, her poetry has appeared in the New York Times, The St. Petersburg Review, TriQuarterly, Black Renaissance Noire, The Cortland Review and elsewhere. Honors for her work include the Hocking Hills Festival of Poetry Prize, the Poe/Faulkner Fellowship, the King-Chavez-Parks Initiative Fellowship and the Margaret Towsley Fellowship. Robin holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Virginia and an MFA in Art & Design from the University of Michigan. Learn more about her at www.valenciarobin.com.

Oct 12, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
11:00 am @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Experience the restorative power of art—join docent June Heintz for a 45-minute exploration of art through a variety of meditative practices.

Reservations are required:

museumoutreach@virginia.edu

or 434.243.2050

Oct 19, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
10:00 am @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

These popular programs combine age-appropriate tours with hands-on art activities that make the Museum's exhibitions accessible to children. 

New session! 10 am - 12 pm

1–3 pm: 5–7 year olds and their grownups 

3–5 pm: 8–12 year olds and their grownups 

Registration is required. Please email museumoutreach@virginia.edu or call 434.243.2050.

Oct 22, 2019

Charlottesville, Virginia 22903
6:30 pm @ Campbell Hall School Of Architecture

This event is FREE and open to the public! UVA School of Architecture, Campbell 153

Artist Talk: D.Y. Begay

D.Y. Begay, a Navajo born to the Totsohni’ (Big Water) Clan and born for the Tachinii’ (Red Running into Earth) Clan, is a fourth-generation weaver. Growing up around female weavers, she was exposed to herding and shearing sheep, carding and spinning wool, harvesting plants for dyeing, and learning to weave in the traditional Navajo fashion. Begay’s tapestries encompass her interpretation of the natural beauty and descriptive colors of the Navajo reservation, reflecting on her Navajo identity. Begay’s work commemorates her family’s weaving tradition by using the unique and local vegetation of the Navajo. This spiritual connection to the plants yields the natural colors that are transformed into evocative land formations on her loom. Her current work combines her mastery of this tradition with unconventional uses of colors and design, producing experiments with non-reservation color combinations in her weavings. 

Begay is a 2018 United States Artists Fellow and is a recipient of the Native American Art Studies Association Lifetime Achievement Award (2013). In 2018 the Museum of Northern Arizona organized Tselani/Terrain: Tapestries of D.Y. Begay, a focused retrospective of her work. Begay’s tapestries have been exhibited in and collected by major museums, including the National Museum of the American Indian, New York City; Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, Santa Fe, NM; Kennedy Museum of Art, Athens, OH; C.N. Gorman Museum, Davis, CA; Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA; Mesa Art Center, Mesa, AZ; National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland; and the Heard Museum. Her work traveled in the Arts in Embassies program in 2006 and 2010. Her latest work, a wintry landscape of northeastern Minnesota commissioned by the Minneapolis Institute of Art, is presently on tour in the acclaimed exhibition Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists. 

Oct 24, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
5:30 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Experience the restorative power of art—join docent June Heintz for a 45-minute exploration of art through a variety of meditative practices.

Reservations are required:

museumoutreach@virginia.edu

or 434.243.2050

Oct 25, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
5:30 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Join us for the Museum’s most popular, recurring social event: Final Fridays! Enjoy lively conversation with friends, connect with art, listen to music, and snack on tasty food and beverages. Want a quick introduction to one of our exhibitions? Final Fridays feature Spotlight Talks by our student docents at 6:15 and 6:45 pm.

Final Fridays are held on the last Fridays of August, September, October, January, February, March, and April, and are free for museum members. Student membership is free with a UVA email address through the support of Arts$ program and non-member guests may attend for a fee of $3.

Oct 26, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
2:00 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

The Fralin Museum of Art’s permanent collection encompasses a wide range of cultures and periods. Over the Museum’s history, particular strengths have grown in the collections of East and South Asian paintings. This exhibition, drawn primarily from the permanent collection with select loans from private collections, is curated by Professors Dorothy Wong and Daniel Ehnbom to illustrate the breadth of the holdings in these areas. On view will be works from China, Japan, and India ranging from the sixteenth to twenty-first centuries.

Images: (left) Tsukioka Yoshitoshi. Lunacy–Unrolling Letters from the series “One Hundred Aspects of the Moon,” 1889. Color woodcut print, 13 3/4 x 9 1/4 in (34.9 x 23.5 cm). Museum purchase with funds from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, 1997.27.2. (right) Indian Artist, Kotah, Rajasthan, India. Rukmini Adorns Herself, ca. 1700–1710. Ink, opaque color, and gold on paper, 15 x 11 3/8 in (38.1 x 28.9 cm). Museum purchase with Curriculum Support Fund, 2008.2.

Oct 30, 2019

6:00 pm @ UVA School of Architecture, Campbell Hall

Visual Narratives in Himalayan Art: Let me Tell You a Story, In Two Versions

by Elena Pakhoutova, Curator of Himalayan Art Rubin Museum of Art

UVA School of Architecture, Campbell Hall, Room TBA

This event is FREE and open to the public!

Elena Pakhoutova (Ph.D. in Asian Art History from the University of Virginia) is Curator of Himalayan Art at the Rubin Museum of Art. Her background in Tibetan Buddhist studies informs her interdisciplinary approach to art history. Her research explores dialogues in the visual traditions of Inner Asia, art and ritual, art production and patronage, text and image, and narrative in Tibetan visual culture. Among her other interests are cross-cultural exchange, material culture, and contemporary Tibetan art. 

At the Rubin Museum, her thematic exhibitions introduced and contextualized Tibetan, Himalayan, and Nepalese art. These include “Gateway to Himalayan Art,” “Once Upon Many Times: Legends and Myths in Himalayan Art,” “Collecting Paradise: Buddhist Art of Kashmir and Its Legacies,” “The Second Buddha: Master of Time,” and co-curated exhibitions “Nepalese Seasons: Rain and Ritual” and “The All-Knowing Buddha: A Secret Guide.” Her cross-cultural exhibitions “Count Your Blessings: The Art of Prayer Beads in Asia” and co-curated “Illuminated: The Art of Sacred Books” presented Himalayan artistic expressions as part of the universal material and ritual culture. Her most recent exhibition “The Power of Intention: Reinventing the (Prayer) Wheel” brings together traditional and contemporary works of art and deconstructs core Buddhist concepts with contemporary new media, immersive, and impermanent media art.

Her talk “Let me tell you a story, in two versions,” will focus on visual narratives in Himalayan art. 

Nov 09, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
11:00 am @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Experience the restorative power of art—join docent June Heintz for a 45-minute exploration of art through a variety of meditative practices.

Reservations are required:

museumoutreach@virginia.edu

or 434.243.2050

Nov 21, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
5:30 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Experience the restorative power of art—join docent June Heintz for a 45-minute exploration of art through a variety of meditative practices.

Reservations are required:

museumoutreach@virginia.edu

or 434.243.2050