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Nov 19, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
12:00 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Maria Varela first engaged in social justice activism by joining the Young Christian Students (YCS) at her south-side Chicago High School. YCS was an international organization inspired by liberation theology to transform oppressive conditions in workplaces, schools and communities. After graduating from college in 1961, Varela worked for two years as a campus organizer for the National Staff of YCS. In 1963, she accepted an invitation to join the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), a civil rights organization operating in the U.S. South.

In 1968 the experienced civil rights activist accepted an invitation from Reies López Tijerina (1926-2015) to join the Land Grant Movement in New Mexico: a movement to restore ancestral lands taken by the U.S. Government and/or stolen by land speculators. Tijerina and other Latino leaders were invited to participate in the Poor Peoples Campaign in Washington DC in June of 1968. Maria Varela was the only photographer embedded with the Chicano delegation for the duration of the campaign.

“The images in this exhibition reflect the evolution of resistance movements over nearly three decades, from demonstrations to political organizing to establishing alternative institutions, which would model what we would do ‘if we were in charge’.”

– Maria Varela

 

El primer compromiso de Maria Varela con el activismo por la justicia social fue cuando se unió a los Jóvenes Estudiantes Cristianos (YCS) en la escuela preparatoria del lado sur de Chicago. La YCS era una organización internacional inspirada por la teología de la liberación que establecía transformar las condiciones opresivas en los lugares de trabajo, las escuelas y las comunidades. Después de graduarse de la universidad (1961), Varela trabajó dos años como organizadora del campus para el Personal Nacional del YCS. En 1963, aceptó la invitación a unirse al Comité Coordinador Estudiantil No Violento (SNCC), una organización de derechos civiles que funciona en el sur de los Estados Unidos.

En 1968 la experimentada activista de los derechos civiles aceptó una invitación de Reies López Tijerina (1926-2015) a unirse al movimiento chicano Land Grant Movement en Nuevo México: un movimiento para restaurar tierras ancestrales tomadas por el gobierno de los EE.UU. y/o robadas por los especuladores de la tierra. Tijerina y otros líderes latinos fueron invitados en junio de 1968 a Washington DC a participar en la Campaña de los Pueblos Pobres. Maria Varela fue la única fotógrafa incluida en la delegación chicana durante el transcurso de la campaña.

“Las imágenes de esta exhibición reflejan la evolución de los movimientos de resistencia durante casi tres décadas, desde las demostraciones hasta la organización política para establecer instituciones alternativas que pudieran generar modelos de lo que haríamos ‘si estuviéramos a cargo’.”

– Maria Varela

Exhibition organized by the National Museum of Mexican Art, Chicago. Sponsors: Chicago Park District, Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, Illinois Arts Council Agency and Southwest Airlines.

This exhibition is made possible for The Fralin Museum of Art through generous support from the Office for Equal Opportunity and Civil Rights at the University of Virginia and The Fralin Museum of Art Volunteer Board. 

The Fralin Museum of Art’s programming is made possible through generous support of The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation. We also wish to thank our in-kind donors: WTJU 91.1 FM and Ivy Publications LLC’s Charlottesville Welcome Book.

Nov 19, 2019

6:00 pm @ UVA School of Architecture, Room 153

UVA School of Architecture

Campbell Hall, Room 153

Free and open to the public!

 

Romero utilizes techniques learned of film, digital, fine art, and commercial photography to produce powerful visual imagery that serves both as social commentary and to bring focus on indigenous female perspectives. She painstakingly constructs narrative scenes that use pop cultural references to visually critique common stereotypes of Native women. After winning her first recognition in 2006, Romero has taken awards at major art markets, and since 2012 she has placed every year in both the prestigious Santa Fe Indian Market and the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market in Phoenix, mostly (but not only) in Photography and Digital Photography categories, among other awards and fellowships.

Nov 20, 2019

200 W Main St, Charlottesville, VA 22902
7:00 pm @ Violet Crown Charlottesville

 

Ellsworth Kelly: Fragments Directed by Edgar B. Howard, Tom Piper Starring Ellsworth Kelly

Rated NR | Runtime 1 hours & 5 minutes  

Ellsworth Kelly is widely regarded as one of the most important abstract painters, sculptors and printmakers working today. Since the beginning of his career, Kelly's emphasis on pure form and color and his impulse to suppress gesture in favor of spatial unity has played a pivotal role in the development of abstract art in America. This documentary elucidates the true complexity of the artist's work as he creates sculptures for the US Embassy in Beijing.

Before the feature we will screen "Duane Michals", a haunting and evocative short film by the photographic master of the same name.

Presented as part of the Downtown Film series in partnership with The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.

 

Nov 21, 2019

6:00 pm @ UVA School of Architecture: Campbell Hall, Room 158

Garden as Cosmos: The Transformation of Flower and Plant Painting in Late Ming Dynasty China

by Kathleen M. Ryor, Tanaka Memorial Professor of International Understanding and Art History, Carleton College

 

UVA School of Architecture

Campbell Hall, Room 158

Free and open to the public!

 

Kathleen M. Ryor is the Tanaka Memorial Professor of International Understanding and Art History at Carleton College, where she teaches East Asian art history. She holds a B.A. in Political and Social Thought from the University of Virginia and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She has published articles in a number of scholarly journals and edited volumes and served for five years as the editor of the journal, Ming Studies. She has also been involved with two large Mellon Foundation funded projects. The first as co-director for the Carleton Global Engagement Initiative, and the second as three-time workshop leader and advisory board member of the Chinese Object Study Workshop for graduate students. Her area of expertise is arts of the Ming and early Qing dynasties in China. Professor Ryor’s research has focused on the artist Xu Wei (1521-93), military patronage of the arts, late Zhe school painting, Buddhist ink painting by secular artists and lay practitioners, as well as the relationship of painting to garden culture, food, and medicine in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the topic of her current project. In addition to her published scholarship and teaching, Professor Ryor has curated or co-curated exhibitions at several colleges and university art museums, most notably the 2012 exhibition, Ancient Masters, Modern Styles: Chinese Ink Painting from the 16th-21stCenturies, at The Fralin Museum of Art.

Nov 22, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
5:00 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Introducing FRALIN AFTER FIVE!

Our late nights have moved from Thursday to Friday. The museum will remain open Friday evenings until 8 pm.

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On November 22, artist and Fralin docent Suzanne Tanner offers sketching in the gallery from 5-6 pm. www.suzannetannertanner.com

Drawing materials provided, however you may bring your own (pencils only, please!).

Space is limited. Please RSVP to laj2m@virginia.edu.

Stay tuned for more details about future Friday programs.

Nov 24, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
11:00 am @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Experience the restorative power of art—join docent June Heintz for a 45-minute exploration of art through a variety of meditative practices.

Reservations are required:

museumoutreach@virginia.edu

or 434.243.2050

Dec 06, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
5:00 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Introducing FRALIN AFTER FIVE!

Our late nights have moved from Thursday to Friday. The museum will remain open Friday evenings until 8 pm.

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Fralin After Five: Scratch Launch Event

December 6, 5-7 pm

Scratch is celebrating the launch of our third issue at The Fralin on December 6th! Please come celebrate the artwork of UVA students with us.

Stay tuned for more details about future Friday programs.

Dec 14, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
11:00 am @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

Experience the restorative power of art—join docent June Heintz for a 45-minute exploration of art through a variety of meditative practices.

Reservations are required:

museumoutreach@virginia.edu

or 434.243.2050

Dec 14, 2019

155 Rugby Road, Charlottesville VA 22903
2:00 pm @ The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA

In 1999, The Fralin was given an exceptional collection composed primarily of work by many of the leading mid-twentieth-century American artists. Given by Buzz Miller in honor of his partner Alan Groh (COLL ’49), the collection is now known as the Alan Groh-Buzz Miller Collection. Andy Warhol, Robert Indiana, Marisol Escobar, Joseph Cornell, Joan Mitchell, Isamu Noguchi, 

among many others are represented in this collection that at once transformed the museum’s holdings. Alan Groh was the long-time director of the famed Stable Gallery in New York City before becoming director at the A.M. Sachs Gallery, thus many of the artists represented were friends of Miller and Groh. In celebration of the twentieth anniversary of this important gift, select works from the Groh-Miller Collection will be on view. 

Image: Buzz Miller and Alan Groh, 1958