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Charlottesville Newsplex

Andy Warhol's iconic art debuts at Fralin Museum

Jun 10, 2016

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (NEWSPLEX) -- Walking into the second floor gallery of the Fralin Museum, you might recognize the prints hanging on the walls as the work of none other than pop art icon Andy Warhol.The Fralin Museum just finished the installation of Warhol prints. According to the museum, the exhibit was inspired by a series of prints they were gifted by the Andy Warhol Foundation back in 2014.

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UVA Magazine

More than a Museum

Jun 01, 2016

Study any painting or sculpture and you’ll find that understanding how the piece’s parts make a whole isn’t always easy to do. This is the challenge put to first-year medical students as part of Clinician’s Eye, a collaboration between the Fralin Museum of Art and the U.Va. School of Medicine that uses art to improve diagnostic skills. “Observation, description, interpretation and communication of everything you’ve seen are really important skills for a physician,” says fourth-year medical student Grace Prince (Med ’15), who participated in the workshops. In one activity, a student will describe an object, and from that alone, another will try to draw it, leading to conversations about hearing and conveying information. “It’s important for patients,” says Prince. “In a lot of handoffs of care we have to be able to describe patients, what their illness is, what their treatment is.” “My idea of a man sitting in a chair might be different from yours. If there’s a wineglass sitting in a room, what does your wineglass look like?” says Marcia Day Childress (Grad ’76, ’96), an associate professor of medical education who, along with the academic curator at the Fralin, Jordan Love, helped create the program, based on similar ones at Harvard and Yale. “Our goal is to school them in more mindful visual attention, how they describe, how they interpret,” says Childress. “There’s a tendency t go straight to, ‘I think I know what’s wrong,’ but that’s a matter of interpretation.

Curator of Exhibitions and Co-Interim Director Rebecca Schoenthal, talks with Les Sinclair about the Andy Warhol collection at The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA.

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UVA Today

Andy Warhol comes to the Fralin

May 31, 2016

Many of pop artist Andy Warhol’s most iconic works – from his portrait series of Marilyn Monroe to a diamond-dusted portrait of Queen Elizabeth II – are now on display in The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.The “Andy Warhol: Icons” exhibition has transformed The Fralin’s Miller Gallery into a colorful celebration of celebrity. Featuring portraits of Monroe, Liza Minnelli, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and many other cultural icons, the exhibition highlights Warhol’s lifelong fascination with pop culture and the manufacture of fame. The show will run through Sept. 18, providing time for UVA professors time to incorporate the works into their summer and fall class syllabi. “Andy Warhol is a 20th-century icon who shrewdly crafted his self-image by capitalizing on the iconicity of contemporary celebrities,” Curator of Exhibitions and Co-Interim Director Rebecca Schoenthal said. “The exhibition is a play on the contemporary notion of the icon, juxtaposed with the traditional notion of the icon.\

American Art Review

Joseph Cornell and Surrealism (PDF)

May 05, 2016

With pioneering works in collage, film montage, and assemblage art, American Joseph Cornell (1903–1972) took his place among the most celebrated of surrealist artist. Drawing on The Fralin Museum's expansive collections of the artist's work and significant international loans, Joseph Cornell and Surrealism examines his emergence and maturation as an artist over the course of the 1930s and 40s, the zenith of surrealism in the United States. A selection of works by other major surrealist artists appear alongside Cornell’s pieces, evoking the vibrant New York milieu of galleries, museums, American and expatriate-European artists, including Marcel Duchamp, Salvador Dalí, Man Ray, René Magritte, and poets, critics, and magazines that contribued to the shaping of his style.

College Magazine

Top 10 Can’t Miss Events at UVA

Apr 11, 2016

“Work hard, play hard” doesn’t just mean frat parties and beer. UVA hosts many events that bring our community together and offer a great way to get out of the library. If you plan to call UVA your home or already do, check out these events before you walk across the stage on graduation day.

The purposefully positioned works comprising “Richard Serra: Prints” fill two rooms of The Fralin’s upstairs gallery space, bookended by Jacob Lawrence on one end and woven works from the Navajo people on the other. Serra’s seemingly simple black-and-white prints, some with globbed-on ink and others a bit smoother, vary distinctly in size, weighted down with portentous titles — “Abu Ghraib,” “Coltrane” or “The Moral Majority Sucks.”Most, though, aren’t intended to relate a distinct story, said Rebecca Schoenthal, the museum’s curator of exhibitions.

Richmond Times-Dispatch

Curator finds 'Struggle' to complete Jacob Lawrence series

Apr 02, 2016

CHARLOTTESVILLE — Jacob Lawrence was one of the pre-eminent American artists of the 20th century, a painter who was socially relevant and creatively prolific for decades. He was a master of narrative imagery, and his work hangs in some of the most prestigious museums and collections in the world. He also was a champion of ordinary people owning extraordinary art, and many of his pieces have disappeared from public view into the homes of his solidly middle-class patrons. The whereabouts of five of those paintings have proved particularly vexing and fueled a dogged pursuit by a museum curator and professor at the University of Virginia.

Makers. Mistresses. Proto-feminists. Those are a just a few of the titles reserved for the artists represented in The Fralin Museum of Art’s “Two Extraordinary Women: The Lives and Art of Maria Cosway and Mary Darby Robinson.” Guest curator Diane Boucher explores the work, themes and ideals that united these 18th-century artists, including the political activism that flew in the face of their own opulent lifestyles. “The term ‘proto-feminist’ is generally used to describe women whose philosophical ideas anticipate the feminist movement of the 20th century,” Boucher told C-VILLE via e-mail. It’s an apt description for Cosway and Robinson, who prioritized the education of girls at a time when women were “generally expected to be either modest wives confined to domestic spaces or decorative ornaments,” Boucher writes.

Charlottesville Tomorrow

Mary Jo Ayers - Neighbor of the Week

Mar 17, 2016

Tell us about your volunteer activities.
Over the years I have enjoyed my volunteer work in schools, church and museums. The main focus of my volunteer work is with the Fralin Art Museum at University of Virginia. When I trained as a docent in 1976 we were a small group of volunteers excited about the University of Virginia recently re-opening Bayly Art Museum. Forty years later I continue in my volunteer capacity as a docent as well as Adjunct Curator of Native American Art at the Fralin Art Museum located in the Bayly Building on the grounds of the University of Virginia.

What inspires you to volunteer?
While I contribute my time and energy I receive so much. By participating in the museum Docent Program I have the opportunity to study and learn about important works of art. More importantly, I have the privilege of sharing what I learn with museum visitors of all ages.

PBS Virginia Currents

Eyes on Art; Pink Ink; Black Elvis; Trio 826 (#2511)

Mar 03, 2016

Find out how Eyes on Art can brighten the lives and relationships of people with early stage Alzheimer’s; Tattoos by Pink Ink that will surprise and move you; Experience the talented artist known as Black Elvis; Classical music from Trio 826 (#2511)

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CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia announced a grant of $815,000 by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which will be utilized to create a research center for the study of the indigenous art of Australia and the Americas at The Fralin, as well as the University’s Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection. The grant is the result of an initiative led by Francesca Fiorani, Professor of Art History and Associate Dean for the Arts and Humanities in the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, working in tandem with The Fralin, the Kluge-Ruhe, and the Mellon Foundation. In part, the grant will support the hiring of two new curators for the University’s impressive collections of indigenous art. It also will pave the way for a new residency program for visiting scholars, artists and curators. Complimented by the $886,000 in contributions by the University, the investment to the Indigenous Art Initiative totals $1.7 million. The funding will span the course of five years. The extensive collection of art at The Fralin Museum of Art spans cultures from across the globe. The Museum’s holdings include 2,000 pieces of Pre-Columbian art; 1,100 works of Asian art; 700 works by artists of the African diaspora; 680 works by Native Americans and continues to grow.

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia welcomed more than 900 students last week, at a premier opening during Final Friday. Lender Jordan D. Schnitzer spoke to students about Serra’s prints and his experiences as a collector. January’s Final Friday shattered the previous attendance record of 651 guests, set in August of 2015. This exhibition showcases the prints of contemporary icon Richard Serra. Best known for his large-scale public sculpture, Serra consistently maintains a practice in related media including film, drawing, and printmaking. The exhibition features his earliest graphic attempts in lithography from 1972 through more recent works created in 2015. “So much of the art-going public is familiar with Serra’s sculpture,” states curator Rebecca Schoenthal. “I am looking forward to introducing our visitors to his graphic oeuvre, which is related, but ultimately independent.”

This semester, visitors to The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia can expect to see art featuring an important woman in Thomas Jefferson’s life, as well as a collection of prints by renowned sculptor Richard Serra, an exhibition of Navajo textiles, and an exploration of cross-cultural depictions of fish and fowl.The exhibitions will include many new pieces loaned from museums across the country and drawn from The Fralin’s extensive collections.

The Cavalier Daily

Fralin holds 29th annual Writer's Eye competition

Sep 22, 2015

The Fralin Museum of Art recently launched its 29th annual Writer’s Eye literary competition — a contest which asks writers to use the visual art of the Fralin as inspiration for their own original pieces of poetry and prose. Exhibitions for the 2015 competition are “Jacob Lawrence: Struggle…From the History of the American People,” “Collection: Sol LeWitt and Photography,” “Cavaliers Collect”­ — a collection of pieces on loan from University alumni — and Cuban photographs from the museum’s own collection. The event is divided into poetry and prose categories among four age groups for grades 3-5, 6-8 and 9-12 and university/adult writers.

Looking to take a road trip this fall? To mark the new school year, ARTINFO has compiled a list of 12 (mostly) off-the-beaten-path university art museums that are worth the trip, from Maine to Washington State.

The Daily Progress C'ville Pulse

Rebecca Schoenthal named curator of The Fralin Museum of Art at UVa

Aug 31, 2015

Rebecca Schoenthal, a professor in the University of Virginia’s art department, has been chosen as the new curator for The Fralin Museum of Art at UVa. Her appointment was announced Friday. Schoenthal was appointed after a national search. Before joining the Fralin as interim curator in December, she served as curator of Second Street Gallery for five years and has been an independent art consultant. Schoenthal, who has a doctorate in art history from UVa, has taught in the department for 17 years and will continue to teach art history classes and work with students to identify and display works that interest them. Schoenthal is known as an expert on American art from the post-World War II era to the present. As curator, she will be responsible for highlighting the museum’s diverse collection of more than 13,000 art objects and adding new perspectives to items that already are on display.

The latest exhibition at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia includes a lithograph by Pablo Picasso, a drawing by the legendary Bob Dylan and a striking canvas by contemporary great Gerhard Richter – all hailing from the living rooms, dining rooms and galleries of ’Hoos around the country. “There is a very lively interest in collecting art among alumni, faculty and friends of the University, and the museum is a natural place to celebrate that and celebrate the importance of art on Grounds,” said Bruce Boucher, director of The Fralin and curator of the exhibition, “Cavaliers Collect.” “Cavaliers Collect,” which opened Friday, celebrates the 80th anniversary of the University’s museum, with 75 pieces on loan from 53 U.Va. alumni, faculty and friends on display until Dec. 20.

The Daily Progress C'ville Pulse

Art Notes for August 27 through September 2

Aug 27, 2015

On Friday, the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will open an exhibit of photographs taken by renowned 20th-century artist Sol LeWitt. The exhibit is "Collection: Sol LeWitt and Photography." The exhibit will also include one of LeWitt's sculptures, “Incomplete Open Cube.” The display will be up through Dec. 20.

On Friday, The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia revealed an aspect of the renowned 20th-century artist Sol LeWitt that many in the art world are unfamiliar with. Exhibition curator William Wylie, a professor of photography and associate chair of studio art in U.Va.’s McIntire Department of Art, was eager to display LeWitt’s photography, though the late artist is perhaps best known for his sculpture and large wall drawings. “Sol LeWitt is one of the most important artists of the 20th century and made hallmark contributions to minimalism and conceptualism,” Wylie said. “While pieces of his photography are periodically shown in museums, an exhibition devoted exclusively to his photography is rare. As a photographer myself, I wanted to show this amazing collection.”

Following an extensive, nationwide search, The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has appointed Rebecca Schoenthal, a professor in U.Va.'s art history department, as the museum’s new curator, overseeing several major exhibitions as a new semester dawns at the museum.Schoenthal holds a Ph.D. in art history from U.Va. and has taught classes in that department on and off for 17 years, focusing on the 20th century. Her background combines academic instruction with curatorial experience in for-profit and non-profit museums. Prior to joining The Fralin as an interim curator in December 2014, Schoenthal spent five years as the curator of Charlottesville’s Second Street Gallery, known for its focus on contemporary art. She has also been an independent art consultant and is well known as an expert on American art from the post World War II period to the present.
“Rebecca Schoenthal brings to The Fralin a strong grounding in modern art as well as extensive experience in the world of commercial art galleries,” said Bruce Boucher, director of The Fralin. “This gives her a particularly fine sense of the contemporary art scene, which is important in our collaborations with the McIntire Department of Art and the broader art world.”

On Friday, The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will reveal an aspect of the renowned 20th-century artist Sol LeWitt that many in the art world are unfamiliar with.Exhibition curator William Wylie, a professor of photography and director of the Studio Art Department in U.Va.’s McIntire Department of Art, was eager to display LeWitt’s photography, though the late artist is perhaps best known for his sculpture and large wall drawings. “Sol LeWitt is one of the most important artists of the 20th century and made hallmark contributions to minimalism and conceptualism,” Wylie said. “While pieces of his photography are periodically shown in museums, an exhibition devoted exclusively to his photography is rare. As a photographer myself, I wanted to show this amazing collection.”

Following an extensive, nationwide search, The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has appointed Rebecca Schoenthal, a professor in U.Va.'s art history department, as the museum’s new curator, overseeing several major exhibitions as a new semester dawns at the museum. Schoenthal holds a Ph.D. in art history from U.Va. and has taught classes in that department on and off for 17 years, focusing on the 20th century. Her background combines academic instruction with curatorial experience in for-profit and non-profit museums. Prior to joining The Fralin as an interim curator in December 2014, Schoenthal spent five years as the curator of Charlottesville’s Second Street Gallery, known for its focus on contemporary art. She has also been an independent art consultant and is well known as an expert on American art from the post World War II period to the present. “Rebecca Schoenthal brings to The Fralin a strong grounding in modern art as well as extensive experience in the world of commercial art galleries,” said Bruce Boucher, director of The Fralin. “This gives her a particularly fine sense of the contemporary art scene, which is important in our collaborations with the McIntire Department of Art and the broader art world.”

Following an extensive, nationwide search, The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has appointed Rebecca Schoenthal, a professor in U.Va.'s art history department, as the museum’s new curator, overseeing several major exhibitions as a new semester dawns at the museum. Schoenthal holds a Ph.D. in art history from U.Va. and has taught classes in that department on and off for 17 years, focusing on the 20th century. Her background combines academic instruction with curatorial experience in for-profit and non-profit museums. Prior to joining The Fralin as an interim curator in December 2014, Schoenthal spent five years as the curator of Charlottesville’s Second Street Gallery, known for its focus on contemporary art. She has also been an independent art consultant and is well known as an expert on American art from the post World War II period to the present. “Rebecca Schoenthal brings to The Fralin a strong grounding in modern art as well as extensive experience in the world of commercial art galleries,” said Bruce Boucher, director of The Fralin. “This gives her a particularly fine sense of the contemporary art scene, which is important in our collaborations with the McIntire Department of Art and the broader art world.”

Charlottesville Newsplex UVA Today

New Crowd-Sourced Exhibit Now Open at The Fralin

Apr 27, 2015

From the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, American museums in recent years have been exploring new ways for museum audiences to participate in deciding what goes into an art exhibit, sometimes turning to online surveys to create crowd-sourced exhibitions. In this spirit, last fall The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia invited the public for the first time to vote online on works from the museum’s permanent collection for an upcoming exhibit. Opening Friday and running through Aug. 2, The Fralin’s new crowd-sourced exhibit, “What is a Line?,” combines the people’s choices with the museum’s professional curatorial expertise, with 60 percent of the works included in the exhibition voted on by the public

From the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, American museums in recent years have been exploring new ways for museum audiences to participate in deciding what goes into an art exhibit, sometimes turning to online surveys to create crowd-sourced exhibitions.In this spirit, last fall The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia invited the public for the first time to vote online on works from the museum’s permanent collection for an upcoming exhibit. Opening Friday and running through Aug. 2, The Fralin’s new crowd-sourced exhibit, “What is a Line?,” combines the people’s choices with the museum’s professional curatorial expertise, with 60 percent of the works included in the exhibition voted on by the public.

A group of University of Virginia students are getting some valuable hands-on experience and the chance to curate their very own exhibit at the university's Fralin Museum.The exhibit, titled "The Body in Motion," is the first ever curated entirely by students at the museum. Ten university interns came up with a theme, medium, and layout for the exhibit. The Fralin Museum's academic curator, Jordan Love, said she was excited to give the interns an opportunity for a hands on experience that they wouldn't normally get until graduate school. Love said because of the experience, the students are better prepared for future jobs.

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As part of an innovative arts internship program this year, University of Virginia students have been exploring The Fralin Museum of Art’s collection, looking for photographs that illustrate the various movements of the human body. The results of their search are now on view. “The Body in Motion” marks the first time U.Va. students have served as sole curators of an exhibit at The Fralin. Previously, students have only assisted professors in specific curating tasks. The exhibit, which runs through Aug. 2, features important works from The Fralin’s collection by celebrated photographers including Weegee, Gary Winogrand and Barbara Morgan (whose photos depict famed dancers Martha Graham and Merce Cunningham).

Spring is just arriving, but the arts are in full bloom at the University of Virginia.The Betsy and John Casteen Arts Grounds has become a centerpiece of the University; the new state-of-the-art Ruth Caplin Theatre now features top-notch dramatic performances; major artists such as celebrated composer Philip Glass and writer James Salter have held residencies; and Tina Fey and Kevin Spacey have had successful appearances as part of the President’s Speaker Series for the Arts. What’s more, U.Va. has become a real destination for the arts, with attendance rising for events ranging from exhibits at The Fralin Museum of Art to the Heritage Theatre Festival to the Virginia Film Festival.

The drawings were shipped with armed guards, the travel schedule kept secret, in frames equipped with their own precise micro-climates and sensors linked to computers in Italy. Once at their destination – a small museum on a Virginia college campus – more than a thousand students lined up on a cold night for their chance to spend time, up close, with Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings.“It’s incomparable, a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” said Aaron de Groft, director of the Muscarelle Museum of Art at the College of William & Mary. “They’re 500 years old and produced by one of the greatest artists in history.” He remembered his own experience, as a student, watching a curator take out a Michelangelo drawing and marveling. “How did I get here?” he remembers thinking. “Someone of great genius touched this. … It’s a very humbling experience.”

Lucian Freud was the grandson of Sigmund Freud, who encouraged him to become an artist. The younger Freud left Germany with his family when Hitler came to power and settled in England, where he painted a diverse group of people; from the civil servant he called Big Sue to Mick Jagger’s fashionable wife. “He had a fascination for pregnant women, and he painted Jerry Hall and Kate Moss, who were best known as tall, sleek models, in the third trimester of their pregnancy.”

After nearly six decades in the business, only the rarest piece of news gives William Acquavella pause. The artist Lucian Freud ringing up the normally unflappable dealer to say, “Bill, the painting’s had a sex change,” however, managed to do the trick. It was 1998 and Freud was well into painting Large Interior, Notting Hill—a group portrait that pictured the artist’s whippet Pluto lying at the feet of writer Francis Wyndham while Jerry Hall nursed her infant son Gabriel Luke in the background—when Hall failed to appear for two of Freud’s exasperatingly thorough sittings. She had, after all, already visited the artist nearly every day for weeks. Without hesitation, Freud simply replaced Hall’s head with that of his longtime assistant David Dawson, who sat in while Hall was truant. In the final painting, Dawson is disturbingly depicted nursing her baby. What’s more, Acquavella had presold Large Interior, Notting Hill to Hall’s husband, Mick Jagger.

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has given the University of Virginia’s Fralin Museum of Art six prints by Andy Warhol, reports Newsplex. The foundation also gifted the Fralin Museum, in 2009, a few of Warhol’s photos from the 1970s and ‘80s. There will be a large exhibition featuring the works next year.

Imagine entering a cave-like studio, its floor spotted with rags and walls textured with years of paint flicked off a loaded brush. You’re naked when you climb onto a small, sheet-covered bed, fully prepared to hold your pose for hours. Standing just a few feet away, an artist scrutinizes your body as he prepares to etch its lines into a copper plate—and when he does, you know he’ll capture your true essence in that moment. Such was the reality for the subjects of celebrated British artist Lucian Freud (a grandson of Sigmund Freud), whose subjects included Kate Moss, Jerry Hall and ordinary people like his children, his art dealer and the local welfare benefits distributor. The Fralin Museum’s latest exhibition, “Lucian Freud: Etchings,” offers a collection of rarely seen prints and one painting from the last two decades of Freud’s life.

The University of Virginia's Fralin Museum of Art has been given six works by famed artist Andy Warhol that were donated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. In 2009, the foundation gave The Fralin museum several of Warhol's photos from the 1970s and '80s, but curators say these new prints highlight Warhol's interest in popular culture. Bruce Boucher, Director of The Fralin Museum of Art, said that "Warhol really was a prophet of kind of a modern vision. He saw what was coming, he appreciated how culture would be commodified, how celebrity would be mass market. He coined the phrase 'in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes,' and I think the works that we have illustrate that."

“Art is what you can get away with,” the late American pop artist Andy Warhol once said. But it also may be what you can give away. As part of Warhol’s legacy, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has been giving away the artist’s work for several years now, and recently completed the third and final round of a record-breaking program of donations. In this wave, the foundation gave away more than 14,000 original Warhol works, mostly photographic material and prints, with the stipulation that museums exhibit the work within five years of the gift. Among the recipients: The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, which received six screen prints in 2014.

Charlottesville Newsplex UVA Today

Lucian Freud: Etchings

Jan 19, 2015

Lucian Freud, one of the most respected artists of the postwar period, was widely celebrated for the powerful and moving portraits he made throughout a career of over seven decades. Created in an era dominated by abstraction and more conceptual practices, Freud's masterful depictions of the human form expanded and challenged ideas of what realist art, in particular portraiture, could be. The grandson of Sigmund Freud, Freud was perhaps best known for his workwith oil paint, a material in which few artists in the postwar period engaged. Yet this exhibition will show that Freud also produced an important body of prints, thus showing the critical place printmaking-specifically etching-held for him. Lucian Freud: Etchings provides an in-depth look at the prints Freud made after returning to the medium in the 1980s. The exhibition will examine the artist's powerful and detailed depictions of the human form and the psychological conditions that characterized his oeuvre. In addition to a selection of nudes, the exhibition will feature a series of portraits of family members (ranging from his children to the artist's dog), associates, and models and muses, such as Leigh Bowery, who frequently appeared in his art. Also included are works that may be less familiar, such as landscapes that combine detailed observations with elements of abstraction, and Freud's interpretations of Old Master works by artists, such as Jean-Siméon Chardin. Together, the etchings will show how Freud, through his masterful depictions of the human form, redefined portraiture. The exhibit runs through April 19.

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The majority of his works were of people, often shown nude, with an intense concentration on the texture and color of flesh. His oeuvre includes images of men, women, fellow artists, family members, those on the outskirts of society, and celebrities ranging from the Queen of England to Kate Moss – all of which show the art of someone whose penetrating gaze could reveal the very soul of the sitter. These are the portraits of British artist Lucian Freud (1922-2011), a grandson of Sigmund Freud who achieved international renown as one of the greatest painters of the 20th century. Running through April 19, The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia hosts the exhibit, “Lucian Freud: Etchings.”

The majority of his works were of people, often shown nude, with an intense concentration on the texture and color of flesh. His oeuvre includes images of men, women, fellow artists, family members, those on the outskirts of society, and celebrities ranging from the Queen of England to Kate Moss – all of which show the art of someone whose penetrating gaze could reveal the very soul of the sitter. These are the portraits of British artist Lucian Freud (1922-2011), a grandson of Sigmund Freud who achieved international renown as one of the greatest painters of the 20th century. Beginning Friday and running through April 19, The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia will host the exhibit, “Lucian Freud: Etchings.”

Acquavella Galleries have collaborated with UVA’s Fralin Museum of Art for an exhibition that opens on Friday titled “Lucian Freud: Etchings.” Often touted as an oil painter, Freud also produced a number of prints in this style during his career; the Fralin show focuses on those created after 1980.

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