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For years, the painting was stowed away, first in the attic of Old Cabell Hall and then in new art storage at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia. Its subject, a young man with a ruffled collar and a velvet cap, was innocuous, but a small plaque on the frame added intrigue with just one name: “Rembrandt.”

Jean Lancaster, the museum’s collections manager, rediscovered the painting in 2016 as she began to prepare for a new exhibition, “Collect, Care, Conserve, Curate: The Life of the Art Object,” which opened on Friday. When examined from the back, the cradle support and wax seal at first appeared to be old, perhaps old enough to be original to the 17th-century Dutch master Rembrandt van Rijn. However, Lancaster was skeptical about the painting itself. 

“I realized that it was probably not a Rembrandt, because it had been tucked away in storage for so many years and never studied,” she said. 

Tucked away in an unassuming and still unadorned office, the new director and chief curator of the University of Virginia’s Fralin Museum of Art plots the future, working to connect not just disparate communities on Grounds but across the Charlottesville area.

It seems like terraces of tasks, but Matthew McLendon, in his post since January, seems excited to figure out what lies ahead.

“I love the dynamism of being on the campus, surrounded by the students and faculty. They’re among our greatest resources,” said McLendon, who follows Bruce Boucher, who left last year for a job at the Sir John Soane Museum in London, in the top post at the Fralin. “But, ultimately, the beauty of the university museum is that we can cut across all the departments and all the curricula.”

It’s a busy, blustery Tuesday on Grounds. Outside The Fralin Museum of Art, UVA students rush by in droves, pulling overcoats tight against the wind. Inside, I stand in darkness staring at craters on the moon. The air is hot and loud, filled by the whir and clank of unsteady projectors shining on gallery walls. Two films, shot on 16mm, broadcast two different sides of the moon.

In one, darkness moves slowly across lumps and pockmarks on a surface the color of aged newspaper. Shadows appear as the moon rotates slowly; when the craters vanish, I feel lost in space. In another, the moon looks like black-and-white fuzz, a dim shadowscape making slow, creeping passage. I’d believe you if you told me the inarticulate surface was a tree trunk or dimpled thigh. Like slow-moving paintings, these films manage to simultaneously abstract the meaning of a simple subject while bridging a gap of 238,900 miles.

That’s the magic of celebrated filmmaker and UVA professor Kevin Everson. He’s known for making experimental films, many of which are shot on single rolls of 16mm film, and most of which depict working-class African-Americans in everyday situations.

Matthew McLendon is the newest director and chief curator for the University of Virginia's art museum. McLendon began as director of The Fralin Museum of Art in January.

When you think of the Ringling family, you probably think of the circus. But The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota is an impressive center of the arts, with a large collection by the old masters.

That's where Matthew McLendon was curator of modern and contemporary art.

 

The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA announced the winners of Writer’s Eye 2016, the 30th anniversary of the Museum’s annual literary competition challenging writers of all ages to create original works of poetry and prose inspired by art.

Writer’s Eye was the brainchild of Carole Armstrong and Valerie Morris—two of the Museum’s docents who launched the program in 1986—and has become a mainstay of the local school curriculum, as well as the University community. The program’s success relies on support by several annual donors, as well as the efforts of nearly 100 University student and community docents, who volunteer to lead twelve weeks of tours to introduce students to artwork selected for the competition.

This year the art selections came from four special exhibitions: Andy Warhol: Icons, THE GREAT WAR: Printmakers of World War I from the VMFAA Gift of Knowing: The Art of Dorothea Rockburne, and New Acquisitions: Photography, as well as from the Museum’s permanent collection. Both the traditional and the contemporary art provoked strong literary responses.

Pulse | The Daily Progress

Fralin Museum of Art announces winners of Writer's Eye 2016

Feb 08, 2017

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia has announced the winners of Writer’s Eye 2016, the 30th-anniversary edition of the museum’s annual literary competition. Winners will be honored from 3 to 5 p.m. March 12 in UVa’s Newcomb Hall Ballroom.

Writers of all ages are encouraged to view pieces of art for inspiration to write original poetry and prose. This year’s art selections were selected from four exhibitions — “Andy Warhol: Icons,” “The Great War: Printmakers of World War I from the VMFA,” “A Gift of Knowing: The Art of Dorothea Rockburne” and “New Acquisitions: Photography” — and the museum’s permanent collection.

This year’s event drew 1,758 entries in four categories — grades three to five, grades six to eight, grades nine to 12 and university/adult. Panels of local writers and teachers judged the younger entrants’ works, and University of Virginia faculty members Lisa Russ Spaar and Christopher Tilghman judged the university/adult and high school categories.

 

Matthew McLendon’s curatorial career has taken him all over the world, from studies in Florence, Italy and a stint working at London’s famed Tate Britain Museum, to his recent six-year tenure at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida.

Now, he is bringing his talents and experience to Charlottesville as the director and chief curator of The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, where he started Jan. 9.

Since his time at the Tate, where he focused on public programming, McLendon has been interested in the museum’s role in education and the unique position of university museums, which can draw on the interdisciplinary activity swirling around them.

Ann Gale: Portraits is on view at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia from September 30, 2016—February 12, 2017.

“Ann Gale: Portraits” - at the Fralin Museum (University of Virginia) through February 12th - portrays, more than individual likenesses, encounters between painter and sitters. Like many contemporary figure painters, Gale revisits turf opened by post-Impressionists and early modernists, before the nude’s role in western painting was further degraded by extreme political adaptations, then repressed by just critiques of its objectifications. Gale’s semi-clad people have names and gaze back with psychological agency, almost resisting their not quite comfortable environments. Yet her enterprise is foremost a formal one: imagery takes shape with constant reference to the matrix of the picture plane. Renewing Mondrian’s evolution from trees to abstract axes, Gale’s naturalistic investigations venture on and off the grid.

For most people, it would be difficult to imagine even vaguely what it might take for Death itself to be stunned by the carnage of a battlefield.

That’s the premise of the 1919 etching “Death Awed” by Percy John Smith. The Englishman’s pen-and-ink drawing opens “The Great War: Printmakers of World War I from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts,” an exhibit being presented through Dec. 18 in the University of Virginia’s Fralin Museum of Art.

From noon to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Stephen Margulies will give a Lunchtime Talk at the museum that will center on the exhibit. As he walks with visitors from print to print, he will point out relevant, and often subtle, aspects of each work.

The Ringling's Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Matthew McLendon will be joining the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia as its director and chief curator starting this coming January.

"We are thrilled to have Matthew join the Fralin," says UVA's Vice Provost for the Arts Jody Kielbasa. "The university is approaching its third century and with that, the museum is looking forward to an exciting new chapter in its own long history. We believe that Matthew provides the leadership the Fralin needs to embark on this new journey."

Over the past six years, McLendon has worked to revolutionize the modern and contemporary holdings at the Ringling, incorporating works by living visual artists while taking advantage of cultural moments to create a new curatorial style and presence, including the ongoing cross-disciplinary series Art of Our Time. Prior to joining the Ringling, McLendon was the curator of academic initiatives at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College, and before that he was at the Tate Modern in London. McLendon holds bachelor's degrees in music and art history from the Florida State Universty and master's and doctoral degrees in the history of art from the Courtauld Institute of Art at the University of London.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The University of Virginia announced today that Matthew McLendon has been appointed director and chief curator of The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia. Currently the curator of modern and contemporary art at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida, McLendon assumes his new role Jan. 9. 

“We are thrilled to have Matthew join The Fralin,” said Jody Kielbasa, UVA’s vice provost for the arts. “The University is approaching its third century and with that, the museum is looking forward to an exciting new chapter in its own long history. We believe that Matthew provides the leadership The Fralin needs to embark on this new journey.” 

Over the last six years, McLendon has revolutionized the modern and contemporary holdings and exhibitions at The Ringling, incorporating works by living visual artists while taking advantage of cultural moments to create a new curatorial style and presence. His exhibitions focus on artists working across genres and periods, enabling cross-disciplinary conversations – a practice he plans to continue at The Fralin.

The University of Virginia announced today that Matthew McLendon has been appointed director and chief curator of The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia. Currently the curator of modern and contemporary art at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida, McLendon assumes his new role Jan. 9.

“We are thrilled to have Matthew join The Fralin,” said Jody Kielbasa, UVA’s vice provost for the arts. “The University is approaching its third century and with that, the museum is looking forward to an exciting new chapter in its own long history. We believe that Matthew provides the leadership The Fralin needs to embark on this new journey.”

Over the last six years, McLendon has revolutionized the modern and contemporary holdings and exhibitions at The Ringling, incorporating works by living visual artists while taking advantage of cultural moments to create a new curatorial style and presence. His exhibitions focus on artists working across genres and periods, enabling cross-disciplinary conversations – a practice he plans to continue at The Fralin.

The University of Virginia announced on Monday that Matthew McLendon, the curator of modern and contemporary art at The Ringling, has been appointed director and chief curator of The Fralin Museum of Art. He will begin his new role on Jan. 9.

“We did a national search and Matthew emerged as our top candidate,” said Jody Kielbasa, UVA’s vice provost for the arts. “We are incredibly impressed with the work that he has done in the past years at the Ringling Museum of Art. I’m of course familiar with it, having lived in Sarasota for 14 years myself and being a graduate of Florida State University. We’re certainly aware of the legacy of work there and we welcome him to the Fralin family.”

Founded in 1935, the Fralin maintains a collection of nearly 14,000 objects and features many international traveling exhibitions. The museum is grounded in academics and has a large role as a teaching facility for University of Virginia students and faculty.

The Atlantic

Why Do Colleges Have So Much Art?

Nov 01, 2016

Look up at the University of California, San Diego, and there may be a small blue house teetering on the roof of a building—a dramatic piece of contemporary artwork. In Austin, the University of Texas raised nearly $22 million for a one-of-a-kind Ellsworth Kelley chapel, while a bold, new 41,000-square-foot contemporary-art institute is underway at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond. Public or private, rural or urban, college museums are tackling ambitious projects like never before, promoting academic curators—who were once part of a sleepier, insular art world—to be lead actors on the cultural stage.

But not everyone agrees that school museums should compete with their mainstream counterparts or that students necessarily benefit more from having art of such magnitude as opposed to more modest collections. The ongoing art wave raises questions about whether college museums have outlived their primary purpose as educational institutions and perhaps now serve a different function in both academic and art circles. The historian Dominic Green recently critiqued the “worldwide arms race among museums,” with each trying to outdo the other. Green was referring to the “grandiosity” of the Tate Modern in London and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, but the same sentiment applies to campus art: How much is too much?

Historically, college museums have called themselves “teaching museums”—in other words, places where students can experience objects and artifacts first-hand, as opposed to merely studying them in textbooks or online. Campus collections were meant to push conversations not only in art-history courses, but across disciplines and departments, too. And often, they still do—while filling a cultural gap in college towns. A recent exhibit at the University of Virginia’s Fralin Museum of Art titled Andy Warhol: Icons, for instance, showed, as the interim co-director Jordan Love described, numerous, epic Warhol silkscreens of figures from Saint Apollonia (the patron saint of dentistry) to Annie Oakley, Liza Minnelli, and Marilyn Monroe, tracing the historical concept of the celebrity. “The Fralin is one of two fine-art museums in Charlottesville,” Love said. “We take pride in providing visitors with the opportunity to view works by world-renowned artists, without having to go to Richmond or D.C.” As a teaching tool, this show asked the university’s sociology, English, history, and media students: From medieval times to the age of Instagram, how do icons gain their status?

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- One of the University of Virginia’s latest 3-D printing projects began as a thank-you gift.

Greg Lewis, at the time a fourth-year student double-majoring in mechanical engineering and classics, enjoyed associate professor Tyler Jo Smith’s 2014 art history class so much that he decided to make Smith a thank-you gift. Combining his interests in art and engineering, he used UVA’s Rapid Prototyping Lab to create a miniature, 3-D-printed vase mimicking the ancient Greek vases he studied in class.

Smith loved the gift – and it gave her an idea. What if she and Lewis teamed up to create exact replicas of ancient Greek vases and teach students about 3-D printing in the process?

Charlottesville, VA: Over at UVA’s Rapid Prototyping Lab, students are scanning, modeling and 3D printing Greek vases. UVA Art History professor Tyler Jo Smith and graduate student Greg Lewis have teamed up with digital resources coordinator Leah Stearns and collections manager Jean Lancaster of The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA. The real value of printing out Greek ceramics is pointed out at the end of the article: “Unlike the original, students pick up, handle and measure the replicas as often as they wish, creating a tactile learning experience not often found in the study of ancient art.”

One of the University of Virginia’s latest 3-D printing projects began as a thank-you gift.

Greg Lewis, at the time a fourth-year student double-majoring in mechanical engineering and classics, enjoyed associate professor Tyler Jo Smith’s 2014 art history class so much that he decided to make Smith a thank-you gift. Combining his interests in art and engineering, he used UVA’s Rapid Prototyping Lab to create a miniature, 3-D-printed vase mimicking the ancient Greek vases he studied in class.

Smith loved the gift – and it gave her an idea. What if she and Lewis teamed up to create exact replicas of ancient Greek vases and teach students about 3-D printing in the process?

UVA Today

History Made New

Oct 12, 2016

One of the University of Virginia’s latest 3-D printing projects began as a thank-you gift.Greg Lewis, at the time a fourth-year student double-majoring in mechanical engineering and classics, enjoyed associate professor Tyler Jo Smith’s 2014 art history class so much that he decided to make Smith a thank-you gift. Combining his interests in art and engineering, he used UVA’s Rapid Prototyping Lab to create a miniature, 3-D-printed vase mimicking the ancient Greek vases he studied in class.Smith loved the gift – and it gave her an idea. What if she and Lewis teamed up to create exact replicas of ancient Greek vases and teach students about 3-D printing in the process?

A new exhibit at the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia dances the eyes from the sublime to the exquisite. "Cavaliers Collect" offers an eclectic mix of art ranging from a large, shimmering orb of blown and carved glass to the captivating gaze of an Irish lad painted by the American master Robert Henri. There are a Grandma Moses, a Bob Dylan, even a Rodin and a Picasso. Included is an enchanting whirligig by Vollis Simpson and a pen-and-wash with gouache by Frederic Remington. Ancient works are represented by Renaissance paintings, bronze sculptures from the 13th century and a horse and rider modeled in clay by an unknown Chinese artist more than 1,000 years ago.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) - The University of Virginia says it's never too early to get an art history lesson.

Once a month The Fralin Museum of Art invites children ages 5-12 to come with an adult for a hands-on approach to history called Family Art JAMs.

The first part of the session is spent on a tour of the newest exhibition to talk about the artist and answer questions. After that it is the student's turn to create art. 

UVA Today

Art in the Trenches

Sep 15, 2016

In 1916, at age 38, Scotsman Muirhead Bone was drafted into the British Army not as a foot soldier, but as the first of many “war artists.” His orders? Create work that would inspire citizens to contribute to the war effort and motivate neutral nations to join in.
One hundred years after Bone was enlisted, his images – and those of several other war artists – are on display in The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia. The newly opened exhibition, “THE GREAT WAR: Printmakers of World War I from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts,” will run through Dec. 18.

Charlottesville Wine & Country Living

Experience Andy Warhol at The Fralin

Sep 15, 2016

This summer, Andy Warhol returned to The University of Virginia. In 2011, following a gift of 153 Andy Warhol photographs from the Andy Warhol Foundation’s Photographic Legacy Project, UVA debuted Society Portraits: Andy Warhol’s Photographic Legacy. The newest Warhol exhibit at the Fralin Museum of Art, Andy Warhol: Icons, features a range of prints by Andy Warhol, also known as the Pope of Pop. Keeping with its mission to promote the community and public’s visual literacy, the Fralin allows visitors to experience some of Warhol’s most famous works, like his Marilyn Monroe paintings. This exhibit, which runs until September 18th, salutes Warhol’s work with the singular image and his pop art featuring famous subjects. The bright prints, popping from the gallery’s dark walls, showcase Warhol’s famous screen printing techniques.

Andy Warhol: Icons features both pieces loaned to The Fralin from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, as well as six pieces from The Fralin’s own collection, another gift from the Andy Warhol Foundation in 2014. Since 2007, The Andy Warhol Foundation has gifted over 29,000 Andy Warhol photographs to 190 American university art museums, and over 14,500 additional Andy Warhol pieces to museums around the globe. The prints now displayed at the Fralin reflect Warhol’s famous photo-based work. Along with being a photographer, Warhol used photos for silk screen printing, manipulating the layers of colors expressed in his images, as well as for painting.

UVA Magazine

Andy Warhol at The Fralin

Sep 15, 2016

Through September 18, visitors to UVA’s Fralin Museum of Art have the opportunity to view an “icon”-ic presentation.

After the Andy Warhol Foundation donated several Warhol pieces to the Fralin in 2014, Curator of Exhibitions Rebecca Schoenthal (Grad ’98, ’05) began researching Warhol’s silk screen of a 15th-century painting of the martyr Saint Apollonia. The piece helped inspire the museum’s current exhibit, Andy Warhol: Icons.

“He painted this Saint Apollonia in the figure of an icon, and that made me start thinking about what an icon is,” Schoenthal says. (She also secured the original “Saint Apollonia,” on loan from the National Gallery of Art in Washington.) “Warhol worked with contemporary celebrity icons like Marilyn Monroe, Liza Minnelli … and Warhol himself has become an icon.”

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia is pleased to announce the new appointment of Adriana Greci Green, PhD, as Curator of the Indigenous Arts of the Americas.
Dr. Greci Green is an art historian, curator and anthropologist, whose expertise in Native American art histories holds an emphasis on the Plains and Great Lakes regions. Her research focuses on 18-20th-century American Indian histories, exploring the contexts in which material culture, art, dress, and cultural performance are produced and circulated, both historically and today. She also looks at how Native Americans have been represented in museums, popular culture, and the media. Dr. Greci Green earned her doctoral degree from Rutgers University. Her interests in sociocultural anthropology include representations of identity, the economic significance of women’s work, indigenous aesthetic systems and material culture studies. Most recently, Dr. Greci Green has served as Lead Curator of the Arts of the Americas Reinstallation Project at the Newark Museum and is a Research Collaborator in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution.

Charlottesville Newsplex UVA Today

Sol LeWitt Wall Drawing Created at The Fralin Museum of Art

Sep 02, 2016

Five creative local artists have been sharpening their pencils all week long, creating a wall drawing from the conceptual artist Sol LeWitt.Three students, a UVa Photography Professor, and a representative from the LeWitt Foundation started Monday on the creation of "Wall Drawing 686" by LeWitt.The artist, known for his wall drawings and sculptures, brings a unique concept to each piece of work that is being carefully implemented at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.

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Charlottesville Newsplex UVA Today

The Fralin Museum Turns 80, Celebrates with Loan Exhibit

Aug 28, 2016

"Cavaliers Collect" is a celebration of the Fralin's 80th Anniversary, and the exhibit consists of loans from collectors with ties to the University of Virginia. Including a variety of genres from Asian to contemporary art and a broad range of The Fralin's own collections, the hope is that visitors will be able to take in the diverse artistic interests of UVa alumni, faculty, parents and friends of the museum. "One of the principle loans we have is a portrait of King Charles I of England who was the first Cavalier, by Anthony van Dyck, who was his court painter," said Director Bruce Boucher, who also curated the exhibit. "I wrote the owner of this painting asking him for something else and he said, 'Well, if it's 'Cavaliers Collect', why not Charles the First?"

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The Frailin Art Museum at the University of Virginia is doing a class every month for early onset Alzheimer's disease patients.

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David Cook recalls one child who was very shy when he first enrolled in the Early Visions program, sponsored by The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia and the Boys & Girls Club of Central Virginia. His home life was in turmoil and he had been isolating himself from peers and teachers, sitting apart in the classroom and on the playground.Slowly, though, he began to talk and joke with his UVA student mentor, to enjoy creating art during the program’s weekly sessions, and to smile again. “It really helped him turn it around a little bit,” Cook said. “He did not sit in the corner anymore and enjoyed interacting with a mentor who was giving him all of his attention.”

Richmond Times-Dispatch

Warhol show at the Fralin

Jul 06, 2016

Andy Warhol seems as prescient as ever, even in death. The obsession with celebrity and self-image that defined his art would have been a perfect fit in the age of social media, selfie sticks and ceaseless self-promotion. “I think he would have loved this age,” Jordan Love, the academic curator and co-interim director of The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, said of the pop-art master, who died in 1987.

Almost everyone knows Andy Warhol. Even those among us who claim some uncaring attitude toward the art world and its haughty regalia can at least recognize the intense gaze beaming out from beneath the guy’s poofy wig. And on the way to notoriety, the Pittsburgh-born artist seemed to have made sure his work featured some pretty well-known people and objects. “He really used these iconic figures,” said Rebecca Schoenthal, standing in The Fralin’s upstairs gallery amid works the curator helped to assemble for “Andy Warhol: Icons.” “The show here is a play in three ways: the iconicity of celebrity, his own iconicity and then the traditional idea of an icon as a religious panel painting.”

artdaily.org

Andy Warhol comes to the Fralin

Jun 18, 2016

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.- Many of pop artist Andy Warhol’s most iconic works – from his portrait series of Marilyn Monroe to a diamond-dusted portrait of Queen Elizabeth II – are now on display in The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.
The “Andy Warhol: Icons” exhibition has transformed The Fralin’s Miller Gallery into a colorful celebration of celebrity. Featuring portraits of Monroe, Liza Minnelli, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and many other cultural icons, the exhibition highlights Warhol’s lifelong fascination with pop culture and the manufacture of fame. The show will run through Sept. 18, providing time for UVA professors time to incorporate the works into their summer and fall class syllabi.
“Andy Warhol is a 20th-century icon who shrewdly crafted his self-image by capitalizing on the iconicity of contemporary celebrities,” Curator of Exhibitions and Co-Interim Director Rebecca Schoenthal said. “The exhibition is a play on the contemporary notion of the icon, juxtaposed with the traditional notion of the icon.”

The Cavalier Daily

The Fralin hosts Warhol exhibit

Jun 17, 2016

The Fralin Museum of Art at the University is showing several of Andy Warhol’s famous prints from May to September of 2016.The exhibition, “Andy Warhol: Icons,” presents silkscreens and screen prints created by Warhol in the 1960s through the 1980s. Subject matters that were repeated and reproduced by Warhol include Venus, Saint Apollonia, Liza Minnelli, Marilyn Monroe and a series of cowboys and Indians.KC Maurer, chief financial officer and treasurer at the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, said Warhol was an ambitious artist for his time.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va (WVIR) - This summer, anyone can enjoy a handful of Andy Warhol pieces of art for free in Charlottesville.The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia is showing off a big gift it received from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.This new exhibit is full of originals, including silkscreens from Warhol's Cowboys and Indians Series.

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Charlottesville Newsplex

Andy Warhol's iconic art debuts at Fralin Museum

Jun 10, 2016

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (NEWSPLEX) -- Walking into the second floor gallery of the Fralin Museum, you might recognize the prints hanging on the walls as the work of none other than pop art icon Andy Warhol.The Fralin Museum just finished the installation of Warhol prints. According to the museum, the exhibit was inspired by a series of prints they were gifted by the Andy Warhol Foundation back in 2014.

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Curator of Exhibitions and Co-Interim Director Rebecca Schoenthal, talks with Les Sinclair about the Andy Warhol collection at The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA.

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UVA Magazine

More than a Museum

Jun 01, 2016

Study any painting or sculpture and you’ll find that understanding how the piece’s parts make a whole isn’t always easy to do. This is the challenge put to first-year medical students as part of Clinician’s Eye, a collaboration between the Fralin Museum of Art and the U.Va. School of Medicine that uses art to improve diagnostic skills. “Observation, description, interpretation and communication of everything you’ve seen are really important skills for a physician,” says fourth-year medical student Grace Prince (Med ’15), who participated in the workshops. In one activity, a student will describe an object, and from that alone, another will try to draw it, leading to conversations about hearing and conveying information. “It’s important for patients,” says Prince. “In a lot of handoffs of care we have to be able to describe patients, what their illness is, what their treatment is.” “My idea of a man sitting in a chair might be different from yours. If there’s a wineglass sitting in a room, what does your wineglass look like?” says Marcia Day Childress (Grad ’76, ’96), an associate professor of medical education who, along with the academic curator at the Fralin, Jordan Love, helped create the program, based on similar ones at Harvard and Yale. “Our goal is to school them in more mindful visual attention, how they describe, how they interpret,” says Childress. “There’s a tendency t go straight to, ‘I think I know what’s wrong,’ but that’s a matter of interpretation.

UVA Today

Andy Warhol comes to the Fralin

May 31, 2016

Many of pop artist Andy Warhol’s most iconic works – from his portrait series of Marilyn Monroe to a diamond-dusted portrait of Queen Elizabeth II – are now on display in The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia.The “Andy Warhol: Icons” exhibition has transformed The Fralin’s Miller Gallery into a colorful celebration of celebrity. Featuring portraits of Monroe, Liza Minnelli, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and many other cultural icons, the exhibition highlights Warhol’s lifelong fascination with pop culture and the manufacture of fame. The show will run through Sept. 18, providing time for UVA professors time to incorporate the works into their summer and fall class syllabi. “Andy Warhol is a 20th-century icon who shrewdly crafted his self-image by capitalizing on the iconicity of contemporary celebrities,” Curator of Exhibitions and Co-Interim Director Rebecca Schoenthal said. “The exhibition is a play on the contemporary notion of the icon, juxtaposed with the traditional notion of the icon.\

American Art Review

Joseph Cornell and Surrealism (PDF)

May 05, 2016

With pioneering works in collage, film montage, and assemblage art, American Joseph Cornell (1903–1972) took his place among the most celebrated of surrealist artist. Drawing on The Fralin Museum's expansive collections of the artist's work and significant international loans, Joseph Cornell and Surrealism examines his emergence and maturation as an artist over the course of the 1930s and 40s, the zenith of surrealism in the United States. A selection of works by other major surrealist artists appear alongside Cornell’s pieces, evoking the vibrant New York milieu of galleries, museums, American and expatriate-European artists, including Marcel Duchamp, Salvador Dalí, Man Ray, René Magritte, and poets, critics, and magazines that contribued to the shaping of his style.

College Magazine

Top 10 Can’t Miss Events at UVA

Apr 11, 2016

“Work hard, play hard” doesn’t just mean frat parties and beer. UVA hosts many events that bring our community together and offer a great way to get out of the library. If you plan to call UVA your home or already do, check out these events before you walk across the stage on graduation day.

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