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Kevin Everson: Rough and Unequal

Image: Kevin Everson, American, b. 1965. Still from Rough and Unequal, 2017. 16mm film, black and white, silent. Image courtesy of the artist.

01/27/2017 to 04/16/2017
Curated by Rebecca Schoenthal, Curator of Exhibitions

The Fralin commissioned Kevin Everson, Professor of Art at UVA, to create a new film, Rough and Unequal. Everson felt a need to reflect upon this place where he lives and works: the University. Lately, however, the space seems fraught and he chose instead to look inward by, in fact, looking outward and upward—the subject of this film is the moon. Filming from McCormick Observatory on Grounds, Everson documented the waxing and waning of the moon. In many ways, this appears a fairly radical departure from earlier work, but one can see ties to, among other themes, the repeated subject of the cycle of labor that appears throughout his oeuvre. While Everson’s films frequently articulate the profundity in every day life via a microcosmic approach that focuses on close-knit communities, the outlook of this new work is macroscopic. The 16mm film will be projected using a single-reel platter system.

Kevin Jerome Everson was born and raised in Mansfield, OH. He has a MFA from Ohio University and a BFA from the University of Akron. He has made eight feature-length films and over 120 shorts, including such award winning films as Park Lanes, The Island of Saint Matthews, Erie, and Sugarcoated Arsenic with Claudrena Harold.

Everson’s films and artwork have been widely shown at venues including Sundance Film Festival, Berlin Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Oberhausen Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, New York Film Festival, The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, Whitechapel Gallery in London, National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, and the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

The Fralin Museum of Art’s programming is generously supported by The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation.

This exhibition was made possible by a generous gift from The Fralin Museum Volunteer Board and the UVA Arts Council. We would also like to thank our in-kind donors: WTJU 91.1 FM and Ivy Publications LLC’s Charlottesville Welcome Book.